Prospectus
Table of Contents

Filed pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3)
File Number 333-164926

PROSPECTUS

LOGO

20,278,690 Shares of Common Stock

4,993,471 Warrants

This prospectus also relates to an offering of 4,993,471 warrants to be offered by the Selling Security Holders. In addition, this prospectus relates to an offering of 20,278,690 shares of common stock to be offered by the Selling Security Holders consisting of:

 

   

4,993,471 shares of common stock that may be sold from time to time by the Selling Security Holders, which are issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants issued in a private placement to our founding stockholders;

 

   

10,666,529 shares of our common stock which are issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants issued in our initial public offering pursuant to a prospectus dated November 14, 2007; and

 

   

4,618,690 shares of common stock that may be sold from time to time by the Selling Security Holders.

Initially, we issued 5,250,000 warrants, or the sponsor warrants, in a private placement to our founding stockholders and 25,000,000 warrants, or the public warrants, in our initial public offering. In connection with our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., on November 13, 2009, we redeemed an aggregate of 12,500,000 warrants, of which 12,243,471 were public warrants. In April 2010, we repurchased an aggregate of 2,090,000 warrants. As of May 28, 2010, there are 4,993,471 sponsor warrants and 10,666,529 public warrants outstanding.

The prices at which the Selling Security Holders may sell their securities will be determined by the prevailing market price for the securities or pursuant to privately negotiated transactions. Information regarding the Selling Security Holders and the times and manner in which they may offer and sell the securities under this prospectus is provided under “Selling Security Holders” in this prospectus.

We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the securities by the Selling Security Holders under this prospectus, although we could receive up to $62,418,387.50 upon the exercise of all of the warrants held by the Selling Security Holders and $133,331,612.50 upon the exercise of all of the outstanding warrants issued in our initial public offering pursuant to a prospectus dated November 14, 2007. Any amounts we receive from such exercises will be used for general working capital purposes.

Our common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange, or the NYSE, under the symbol “KW.” On May 28, 2010, the closing sale price of our common stock was $11.03 per share.

Investing in the common stock involves risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 5.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities, or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

The date of this prospectus is June 11, 2010.


Table of Contents

You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. We have not authorized anyone to provide you with different information. We are not making an offer of these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer is not permitted. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the front of this prospectus.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

SUMMARY

   1

THE OFFERING

   3

SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

   4

RISK FACTORS

   5

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

   18

USE OF PROCEEDS

   19

PRICE RANGE OF COMMON STOCK

   20

DIVIDEND POLICY

   20

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

   21

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

   22

BUSINESS

   41

MANAGEMENT

   53

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

   61

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

   75

PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS

   76

SELLING SECURITY HOLDERS

   78

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

   81

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

   86

LEGAL MATTERS

   88

EXPERTS

   88

WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

   88

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

   F-1


Table of Contents

SUMMARY

This summary only highlights the more detailed information appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. As this is a summary, it does not contain all of the information that you should consider in making an investment decision. You should read this entire prospectus carefully, including the information under “Risk Factors” and our financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus, before investing. Unless otherwise specified or the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus to “we”, “us”, “our” or “Company” refer to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. together with its subsidiaries and affiliated entities.

Our Company

Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. is a holding company whose primary business operations are conducted through its wholly owned subsidiary, Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.

Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware on July 9, 2007, under the name “Prospect Acquisition Corp.” as a blank check company to serve as a vehicle to effect a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition or other similar business combination with an operating business in the financial services industry.

On November 13, 2009, KW Merger Sub Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Prospect Acquisition Corp., merged with and into Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., resulting in Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. becoming a wholly owned subsidiary of Prospect Acquisition Corp. Promptly after the merger, we changed our name to “Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.”

Prior to the business combination with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. had no operating business.

Founded in 1977, Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. is a diversified, international real estate company that provides investment and real estate services. Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. has grown from an auction business in one office into a vertically-integrated operating company with over 300 professionals in 21 offices throughout the U.S. and Japan. Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. is an industry leader, currently owning real estate (through its closed-end funds and joint ventures) and managing over 40 million square feet of residential, multifamily and commercial real estate, including 10,000 apartment units, throughout the U.S. and Japan.

Our Industry

Our business covers various segments that compose the real estate investments and services industries. Our operations within the real estate investments and services industries are defined by two core business units:

 

   

KW Investments: We formalized our investing activities in 1999 by creating an investment arm, KW Investments. Through this investment arm, we co-invest through separate accounts and closed-end funds in the acquisition of real estate including office, multi-family, loans, retail, hotels, residential condominiums and land for development. We aim to create value with our hands-on approach and seek to harvest value through an exit strategy which is established at the time of acquisition. KW Investments consists of more than 20 investment professionals whose time is dedicated to sourcing, analyzing, executing and managing fund and joint venture investments. In June 2009, we formed KW Capital Markets with the primary function of raising private and institutional capital, assisting with investor relations, and managing other strategic initiatives.

 

   

KW Services: Through our services group, KW Services, we offer a comprehensive line of real estate services for the full life-cycle of real estate ownership and investment. KW Services provides property management, auction marketing, brokerage, construction and trust management services to financial institutions, other institutional clients and individual investors. Through our extensive network of property managers and brokers, KW Services provides access to real-time market knowledge and trends, along with proprietary deal flow to KW Investments.

 

1


Table of Contents

Our Competitive Position

We compete with a range of both local and national real estate firms, individual investors and corporations. Because of our unique combination of businesses, we compete with brokerage and property management companies as well as companies that invest in real estate and distressed notes. The brokerage and property management businesses are both highly fragmented and competitive. We compete with real estate brokerage companies on the basis of our relationship with property owners, quality of service, and commissions charged. We compete with property management and leasing firms also on the basis of our relationship with clients, the range and quality of services provided, and fees and commissions charged. Our investment operations compete to varying degrees with real estate investment partnerships and other investment companies. We compete with these other investors on the basis of our relationship with the sellers and our ability to close an investment transaction in a short time period at competitive pricing.

Our Strengths

We believe we have a unique platform from which to execute our investment and services strategy due to the fact we have both an auction business and an investment platform. We believe that our platform provides significant competitive advantages over other real estate buyers operating stand-alone or investment-focused firms and may allow us to generate superior risk-adjusted returns. Our investment strategy focuses on investments that offer significant appreciation potential through intensive property management, leasing, repositioning, redevelopment and the opportunistic use of capital.

Our Strategy and Target Markets

Our investment style and philosophy has been consistent over the past decade and seeks to drive the ongoing strategy for future investments. The three core fundamentals include:

 

   

Significant proprietary deal flow from an established network of industry relationships;

 

   

Focus on a systematic research process with a disciplined approach to investing; and

 

   

Superior in-house operating execution.

Our initial target submarkets, which include southern California, the San Francisco Bay area, the Puget Sound area (Greater Seattle), Hawaii and the Greater Tokyo area, share certain similar characteristics that we believe can create investment opportunities. Among these commonalities are dense populations, high barriers to entry, scarcity of land and supply constraints.

We believe that real estate is a local business. With this in mind, we intend to continue to focus on the markets that we know well through both our investment experience and service businesses. We intend to continue to target markets that we have been successful in historically due to our in-depth knowledge and relationships.

Our Executive Offices

Our principal executive offices are located at 9701 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 700, Beverly Hills, CA 90212 and our telephone number is (310) 887-6400. Our website is http://www.KennedyWilson.com. The information contained in, or that can be accessed through, our website is not part of this prospectus.

 

2


Table of Contents

THE OFFERING

 

Securities offered:    Up to 4,993,471 warrants. In addition, up to 20,278,690 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001, consisting of:
  

•   4,993,471 shares of common stock underlying warrants purchased by our founding stockholders in a private placement;

  

•   10,666,529 shares of common stock underlying warrants issued in our initial public offering pursuant to a prospectus dated November 14, 2007; and

  

•   4,618,690 shares of common stock purchased by our founding stockholders in a private placement and issued to certain of our officers and directors in connection with our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.

NYSE symbol:    KW
Use of Proceeds:    We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the securities by the Selling Security Holders under this prospectus, although we could receive up to $62,418,387.50 upon exercise of all of the warrants held by the Selling Security Holders and $133,331,612.50 upon exercise of all of the outstanding warrants issued in our initial public offering pursuant to the prospectus dated November 14, 2007. Any amounts we receive from such exercised will be used for general working capital purposes.
Risk Factors:    An investment in our securities is subject to a number of risks. Before making an investment in our securities, you should carefully consider the risks referred to in the section entitled “Risk Factors” beginning on page 5 of this prospectus.

 

3


Table of Contents

SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables set forth our summary financial data for the periods indicated. You should read this information together with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. Historical financial information may not be indicative of our future performance and the results for the three months ended March 31, 2010, are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the full fiscal year.

 

     Year Ended December 31,    Three months ended March 31,  
     2009     2008    2007    2010     2009  

Statements of operations data:

            

Revenue

   $ 86,235,000      $ 32,225,000    $ 33,393,000    $ 10,826,000      $ 12,483,000   

Merger-related operating expenses

     16,120,000        —        —        —          —     

Other operating expenses

     78,752,000        32,571,000      43,180,000      14,871,000        11,942,000   

Equity in joint venture income (loss)

     8,019,000        10,097,000      27,433,000      1,308,000        (192,000

(Loss) income from continuing operations

     (9,657,000 )     667,000      9,037,000      (2,572,000     (1,459,000

(Loss) earnings per share from continuing operations

   $ (0.36 )   $ 0.03    $ 0.47    $ (0.08   $ (0.06

 

     As of March 31,
2010

Balance sheet data:

  

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 43,729,000

Investments in real estate and joint ventures

     239,008,000

Total assets

     333,354,000

Debt

     127,083,000

Kennedy-Wilson equity

     175,893,000

Total equity

     176,406,000

 

4


Table of Contents

RISK FACTORS

An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should consider carefully all of the material risks described below, together with the other information contained in this prospectus before making a decision to invest in our common stock. If any of the following events occur, our business, financial condition and operating results may be materially adversely affected. In that event, the trading price of our securities could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. This prospectus also contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements as a result of specific factors, including the risks described below.

Risks Related to Our Business

The success of our business is significantly related to general economic conditions and the real estate industry and, accordingly, our business has been and could continue to be harmed by the economic slowdown and downturn in real estate asset values, property sales and leasing activities.

Our business is closely tied to general economic conditions and the real estate industry. As a result, our economic performance, the value of our real estate and real estate secured notes, and our ability to implement our business strategies may be affected by changes in national and local economic conditions. The condition of the real estate markets in which we operate tends to be cyclical and related to the condition of the economy in the U.S. and Japan as a whole and to the perceptions of investors of the overall economic outlook. Rising interest rates, declining demand for real estate or periods of general economic slowdown or recession have had a direct negative impact on the real estate market in the past and a recurrence of these conditions in the U.S. or a deeper recession in Japan could result in a reduction in our revenues. In addition, the economic condition of each local market where we operate may be dependent on one or more industries. Our ability to change our portfolio promptly in response to economic or other conditions is limited. Certain significant expenditures, such as debt service costs, real estate taxes, and operating and maintenance costs are generally not reduced when market conditions are poor. These factors would impede us from responding quickly to changes in the performance of our investments and could adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. We have experienced in past years, are currently experiencing, and expect in the future to be negatively impacted by, periods of economic slowdown or recession, and corresponding declines in the demand for real estate and related services, within the markets in which we operate. The current economic recession has been extraordinary for its worldwide scope, its severity and its impact on major financial institutions, among other aspects. The current recession and the downturn in the real estate market have resulted in and/or may continue to result in:

 

   

a general decline in rents due to defaulting tenants or less favorable terms for renewed or new leases;

 

   

fewer purchases and sales of properties by clients, resulting in a decrease in property management fees and brokerage commissions;

 

   

a decline in actual and projected sale prices of our properties resulting in lower returns on the properties in which we have invested;

 

   

higher interest rates, higher loan costs, less desirable loan terms and a reduction in the availability of mortgage loans and mezzanine financing, all of which could increase costs and could limit our ability to acquire additional real estate assets; and

 

   

a decrease in the availability of lines of credit and other sources of capital used to purchase real estate investments and distressed notes.

 

5


Table of Contents

We could lose part or all of our investment in the real estate properties we have interests in, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

There is the inherent possibility in all of our real estate investments that we could lose all or part of our investment. Real estate investments are generally illiquid, which may affect our ability to change our portfolio in response to changes in economic and other conditions. Moreover, in our joint ventures and funds that invest in real estate, we may not be able to unilaterally decide the timing of the disposition of an investment, and as a result, may not control when and whether any gain will be realized or loss avoided. The value of our investments can also be diminished by:

 

   

civil unrest, acts of war and terrorism and acts of God, including earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters (which may result in uninsured or underinsured losses);

 

   

the impact of present or future legislation in the U.S. or in Japan (including environmental regulation, changes in laws concerning foreign ownership of property, changes in real estate tax rates, changes in zoning laws and laws requiring upgrades for disabled persons) and the cost of compliance with these types of legislation; and

 

   

liabilities relating to claims to the extent insurance is not available or is inadequate.

We may be unsuccessful in renovating the development properties we acquire resulting in investment losses.

Part of our investment strategy is to locate and acquire real estate assets that we believe are undervalued and to improve them to increase their resale value. We face risks arising from the acquisition of properties not yet fully developed or in need of substantial renovation or redevelopment, particularly the risk that we overestimate the value of the property and the risk that the cost or time to complete the renovation or redevelopment will exceed the budgeted amount. Such delays or cost overruns may arise from:

 

   

shortages of materials or skilled labor;

 

   

a change in the scope of the original project;

 

   

the difficulty in obtaining necessary zoning, land-use, environmental, building, occupancy and other governmental permits and authorization;

 

   

the discovery of structural or other latent defects in the property once construction has commenced; and

 

   

delays in obtaining tenants.

Any failure to complete a redevelopment project in a timely manner and within budget or to sell or lease the project after completion could have a material adverse effect upon our business, results of operation and financial condition.

We may not recover part or any of our investment in the mezzanine loans we make or acquire due to a number of factors including the fact that such loans are subordinate to the interests of senior lenders.

We have made and expect to continue to make or acquire mezzanine loans, which are loans that are secured by real property, but are subject to the interests of lenders who are senior to us. These mezzanine loans are considered to involve a high degree of risk compared to other types of loans secured by real property. This is due to a variety of factors, including that a foreclosure by the holder of the senior loan could result in its mezzanine loan becoming uncollectible. Accordingly, we may not recover the full amount, or any, of our investment in mezzanine loans. In addition, mezzanine loans may have higher loan to value ratios than conventional term loans.

 

6


Table of Contents

Our operations in Japan subject us to additional social, political and economic risks associated with conducting business in foreign countries, which may materially adversely affect our business and results of operations.

One of our strategies for the future is to continue our operations and investments in Asia, particularly in Japan. In furtherance of this strategy, we expect to commit additional resources to expand our sales and marketing activities in Japan and expand our service offerings and products in selected markets throughout Asia.

If we are successful in implementing this strategy, the increased scope of our international operations may lead to more volatile financial results and difficulties in managing our businesses. This volatility and difficulty could be caused by, among other things, the following:

 

   

restrictions and problems relating to the repatriation of profits;

 

   

difficulties and costs of staffing and managing international operations;

 

   

the burden of complying with multiple and potentially conflicting laws;

 

   

laws restricting foreign companies from conducting business and unexpected changes in regulatory requirements;

 

   

the impact of different business cycles and economic instability;

 

   

political instability and civil unrest;

 

   

greater difficulty in perfecting our security interests, collecting accounts receivable, foreclosing on security and protecting our interests as a creditor in bankruptcies in certain geographic regions;

 

   

potentially adverse tax consequences;

 

   

share ownership restrictions on foreign operations;

 

   

Japanese property and income taxes, tax withholdings and tariffs; and

 

   

geographic, time zone, language and cultural differences between personnel in different areas of the world.

The current economic downturn has significantly affected countries throughout Asia, including Japan. The worldwide recession has led to falling stock prices and asset values in Asia and reduced economic growth prospects in Asia. Several property markets in Asia have been affected by real estate developments that resulted in an oversupply of completed or partially completed space. Property prices have fallen along with prices of other investments and asset values.

Our joint venture activities subject us to unique third-party risks, including risks that other participants may become bankrupt or take action contrary to our best interests.

We have utilized joint ventures for large commercial investments and real estate developments. We plan to continue to acquire interests in additional limited and general partnerships, joint ventures and other enterprises, collectively referred to herein as “joint ventures”, formed to own or develop real property or interests in real property or note pools. It is our strategy in Japan to invest primarily through joint ventures. We have acquired and may acquire minority interests in joint ventures and we may also acquire interests as a passive investor without rights to actively participate in management of the joint ventures. Investments in joint ventures involve additional risks, including the possibility that the other participants may become bankrupt or have economic or other business interests or goals which are inconsistent with ours, that we will not have the right or power to direct the management and policies of the joint

 

7


Table of Contents

ventures and that other participants may take action contrary to our instructions or requests and against our policies and objectives. Should a participant in a material joint venture act contrary to our interest, it could have a material adverse effect upon our business, results of operations and financial condition. Moreover, we cannot be certain that we will continue these investments, or that we can identify suitable joint venture partners and form new joint ventures in the future.

We purchase distressed notes that have a higher risk of default and delinquencies than newly originated loans and as a result, we may lose part or all of our investment in such notes.

We may purchase notes that are unsecured or secured by real or personal property. These notes are generally non-performing or sub-performing, and often are in default at the time of purchase. In general, the distressed notes we acquire are highly speculative investments and have a greater than normal risk of future defaults and delinquencies as compared to newly originated loans. Returns on loan investments depend on the borrower’s ability to make required payments or, in the event of default, our security interests, if any, and our ability to foreclose and liquidate whatever property may be securing the note. We cannot be sure that we will be able to collect on a defaulted loan or foreclose on security successfully or in a timely fashion. There may also be instances when we are able to acquire title to an underlying property and sell it, but not make a profit on its investment.

We may not be successful in competing with companies in the real estate services and investment industry, some of which may have substantially greater resources than we do.

Real estate services and investment businesses are highly competitive. Our principal competitors include both large multinational companies and national and regional firms, such as Jones Lang LaSalle, Inc. and CB Richard Ellis, Inc. Many of our competitors have greater financial resources and a broader global presence than we do. We compete with companies in the U.S., and to a limited extent, in Japan, with respect to:

 

   

selling commercial and residential properties on behalf of customers through brokerage and auction services;

 

   

leasing and property management, including construction and engineering services;

 

   

purchasing commercial and residential properties, as well as undeveloped land for our own account; and

 

   

acquiring secured and unsecured loans.

Our property management operations must compete with a growing number of national firms seeking to expand market share. There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to compete effectively, maintain current fee levels or arrangements, continue to purchase investment property profitably or avoid increased competition.

If we are unable to maintain or develop new client relationships, our property management business and financial condition could be substantially impaired.

We are highly dependent on long-term client relationships and on revenues received for services under various property management agreements with third-party owners and related parties. A considerable amount of our revenues are derived from fees related to these agreements.

The majority of our property management agreements are cancelable prior to their expiration by the client for any reason on as little as 30 to 60 days’ notice. These contracts also may not be renewed when their respective terms expire. If we fail to maintain existing relationships, fail to develop and maintain new client relationships or otherwise lose a substantial number of management agreements, we could experience a material adverse change in our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

8


Table of Contents

Decreases in the performance of the properties we manage are likely to result in a decline in the amount of property management fees and leasing commissions we generate.

Our property management fees are generally structured as a percentage of the revenues generated by the properties that we manage. Similarly, our leasing commissions typically are based on the value of the lease commitments. As a result, our revenues are adversely affected by decreases in the performance of the properties we manage and declines in rental value. Property performance will depend upon, among other things, our ability to control operating expenses (some of which are beyond our control), and financial conditions generally and in the specific areas where properties are located and the condition of the real estate market generally. If the performance or rental values of the properties we manage decline, the management fees and leasing commissions we derive from such properties could be materially adversely affected.

Our leasing activities are contingent upon various factors including tenant occupancy and rental rates, which if adversely affected, could cause our operating results to suffer.

A significant portion of our property management business involves facilitating the leasing of commercial space. In certain areas of operation, there may be inadequate commercial space to meet demand and there is a potential for a decline in the number of overall lease and brokerage transactions. In areas where the supply of commercial space exceeds demand, we may not be able to renew leases or obtain new tenants for our owned and managed rental properties as leases expire. Moreover, the terms of new leases and renewals (including renovation costs or costs of concessions to tenants) may be less favorable than current leases. Our revenues may be adversely affected by the failure to promptly find tenants for substantial amounts of vacant space, if rental rates on new or renewal leases are significantly lower than expected, or if reserves for costs of re-leasing prove inadequate. We cannot be sure that we can continue to lease properties for our clients and for our own account in a profitable manner.

 

   

Our ability to lease properties also depends on:

 

   

the attractiveness of the properties to tenants;

 

   

competition from other available space;

 

   

our ability to provide for adequate maintenance and insurance and to pay increased operating expenses which may not be passed through to tenants;

 

   

the availability of capital to periodically renovate, repair and maintain the properties, as well as for other operating expenses; and

 

   

the existence of potential tenants desiring to lease the properties.

If we are unable to identify, acquire and integrate suitable acquisition targets, our future growth will be impeded.

Acquisitions and expansion have been, and will continue to be, a significant component of our growth strategy for the future. While maintaining our existing business lines, we intend to continue to pursue a sustained growth strategy by increasing revenues from existing clients, expanding the breadth of our service offerings, seeking selective co-investment opportunities and pursuing strategic acquisitions.

Our ability to manage our growth will require us to effectively integrate new acquisitions into our existing operations while managing development of principal properties. We expect that significant growth in several business lines occurring simultaneously will place substantial demands on our managerial, administrative, operational and financial resources. We cannot be sure that we will be able to successfully manage all factors necessary for a successful expansion of our business. Moreover, our strategy of growth depends on the existence of and our ability to identify attractive and synergistic acquisition targets. The unavailability of suitable acquisition targets, or our inability to find them, may result in a decline in business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

9


Table of Contents

Our business is highly dependent upon the economy and real estate market in California which has recently experienced a significant downturn and is vulnerable to future decline.

We have a high concentration of our business activities in California. Consequently, our business, results of operations and financial condition are dependent upon general trends in the California economy and real estate market. The California economy has experienced a significant downturn in the current recession and a sustained decline in the value of California real estate. Real estate market declines in California have become so severe that the market value of a number of properties securing loans has become significantly less than the outstanding balances of those loans. Real estate market declines may negatively affect our ability to sell property at a profit. In addition, California historically has been vulnerable to certain natural disaster risks, such as earthquakes, floods, wild fires and erosion-caused mudslides. The existence of adverse economic conditions or the occurrence of natural disasters in California could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our auction services business has historically been countercyclical and, as a result, our operating results may be adversely affected when general economic conditions are improving.

Our results of operations are dependent on the performance of our auction services group, which historically has been countercyclical. Our auction services group has recently experienced an increase in revenues due to, among other things, the substantial increase in the number of foreclosures stemming from the current economic crisis. Improvements in general economic conditions may cause auction service revenues to decrease, which could cause a material adverse impact on our results of operations.

We own real estate properties located in Hawaii, which subjects us to unique risks relating to, among other things, the current recession in Hawaii, Hawaii’s economic dependence on fluctuating tourism, the isolated location of Hawaii and the potential for natural disasters.

We conduct operations and own properties in Hawaii. Consequently, our business, results of operations and financial condition are dependent upon and affected by general trends in the Hawaiian economy and real estate market. The Hawaiian economy has experienced a significant downturn in the current recession and a sustained decline in the value of Hawaiian real estate. Real estate market declines may negatively affect our ability to sell property at a profit. In addition, Hawaii’s economy is largely dependent upon tourism, which is subject to fluctuation and has recently experienced a significant drop. Hawaii historically has also been vulnerable to certain natural disaster risks, such as tsunamis, hurricanes and earthquakes, which could cause damage to properties owned by us or property values to decline in general. Hawaii’s remote and isolated location also may create additional operational costs and expenses, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial results.

We have certain obligations in connection with our real estate brokerage services which could subject us to liability in the event litigation is initiated against us for an alleged breach of any such obligation.

As a licensed real estate broker, we and our licensed employees are subject to certain statutory due diligence, disclosure and standard-of-care obligations. Failure to fulfill these obligations could subject us or our employees to litigation from parties who purchased, sold or leased properties they brokered or managed. In addition, we may become subject to claims by participants in real estate sales claiming that we did not fulfill our statutory obligations as a broker.

We may become subject to claims for construction defects or other similar actions in connection with the performance of our property management services.

In our property management capacity, we hire and supervise third-party contractors to provide construction and engineering services for our properties. While our role is limited to that of a supervisor, we cannot be sure that we will not be subjected to claims for construction defects or other similar actions. Adverse outcomes of property management litigation could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

10


Table of Contents

Our properties may subject us to potential environmental liability.

Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of real estate may be liable for the cleanup of hazardous or toxic substances and may be liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage and for investigation and clean-up costs incurred by governmental entities or third parties in connection with the contamination. Such laws typically impose liability without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of the hazardous or toxic substances, even when the contaminants were associated with previous owners or operators. The costs of investigation, remediation or removal of hazardous or toxic substances may be substantial, and the presence of those substances, or the failure to properly remediate those substances, may adversely affect the owner’s or operator’s ability to sell or rent the affected property or to borrow using the property as collateral. The presence of contamination at a property can impair the value of the property even if the contamination is migrating onto the property from an adjoining property. Additionally, the owner of a site may be subject to claims by parties who have no relation to the property based on damages and costs resulting from environmental contamination emanating from the site.

In connection with the direct or indirect ownership, operation, management and development of real properties, we may be considered an owner or operator of those properties or as having arranged for the disposal or treatment of hazardous or toxic substances. Therefore, we may be potentially liable for removal or remediation costs.

Certain federal, state and local laws, regulations and ordinances also govern the removal, encapsulation or disturbance of asbestos-containing materials during construction, remodeling, renovation or demolition of a building. Such laws may impose liability for release of asbestos-containing materials, and third parties may seek recovery from owners or operators of real properties for personal injuries associated with asbestos-containing materials. We may be potentially liable for those costs for properties that we own. In the past, we have been required to remove asbestos from certain buildings that we own. There can be no assurance that in the future we will not be required to remove asbestos from our buildings or incur other substantial costs of environmental remediation.

Before consummating the acquisition of a particular piece of property, it is our policy to retain independent environmental consultants to conduct a thorough environmental review of the property to check for contaminants, including performing a Phase I environmental review. These assessments have included, among other things, a visual inspection of the properties and the surrounding area and a review of relevant federal, state and historical documents. To date, the assessments we have had done have not revealed any environmental liability that we believe would have a material adverse effect on our business, assets or results of operations as a whole, nor are we aware of any material environmental liability of the types described. Nevertheless, it is possible that the assessments we commissioned do not reveal all environmental liabilities or that there are material environmental liabilities of which we are currently unaware. There can be no assurance that future laws, ordinances or regulations will not impose any material environmental liability or that the current environmental condition of our properties will not be affected by tenants, by the condition of land or operations in the vicinity of those properties, or by unrelated third parties. We have not been notified by any governmental authority, and are not otherwise aware of any material noncompliance, liability or claim relating to hazardous or toxic substances in connection with any of our properties. There can be no assurance that federal, state and local agencies or private plaintiffs will not bring these types of actions in the future, or that those actions, if adversely resolved, would not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may incur unanticipated expenses relating to laws benefiting disabled persons.

The Americans with Disabilities Act, or the ADA, generally requires that public accommodations such as hotels and office buildings be accessible to disabled people. We believe that our properties are in substantial compliance with the ADA and that we will not be required to make substantial capital expenditures to address the requirements of the ADA. If, however, our properties are not in compliance with the ADA, the U.S. federal government could fine us or private litigants could be awarded money damages. If we are required to make substantial alterations to one or more of our properties, our results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

 

11


Table of Contents

We may incur significant costs complying with laws, regulations and covenants that are applicable to our properties and operations.

The properties in our portfolio and our operations are subject to various covenants and federal, state and local laws and regulatory requirements, including permitting and licensing requirements. Such laws and regulations, including municipal or local ordinances, zoning restrictions and restrictive covenants imposed by community developers may restrict our use of our properties and may require us to obtain approval from local officials or community standards organizations at any time with respect to our properties, including prior to acquiring a property or when undertaking renovations of any of our existing properties. Among other things, these restrictions may relate to fire and safety, seismic, asbestos-cleanup or hazardous material abatement requirements. There can be no assurance that existing laws and regulations will not adversely affect us or the timing or cost of any future acquisitions or renovations, or that additional regulations will not be adopted that increase such delays or result in additional costs. Our failure to obtain required permits, licenses and zoning relief or to comply with applicable laws could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our property insurance coverages are limited and any uninsured losses could cause us to lose part or all of our investment in our insured properties.

We carry comprehensive general liability coverage and umbrella coverage on all of our properties with limits of liability which we deem adequate and appropriate under the circumstances (subject to deductibles) to insure against liability claims and provide for the cost of legal defense. There are, however, certain types of extraordinary losses that may be either uninsurable, or that are not generally insured because it is not economically feasible to insure against those losses. Should any uninsured loss occur, we could lose our investment in, and anticipated revenues from, a property, which loss or losses could have a material adverse effect on our operations. Currently, we also insure some of our properties for loss caused by earthquake in levels we deem appropriate and, where we believe necessary, for loss caused by flood. We cannot be sure that the occurrence of an earthquake, flood or other natural disaster will not have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Related to Our Company

If we are unable to raise additional debt and equity capital, our results of operations could suffer.

We depend upon third-party equity and debt financings to acquire properties through our investment business, which is a key driver of future growth. We estimate that in the next 12 to 18 months our acquisition plan will require between approximately $650 million and $1.3 billion in third-party equity and between approximately $1.3 billion and $2.6 billion in third-party debt. We expect to obtain debt financing from seller financing, the assumption of existing loans, government agencies and financial institutions. We expect to obtain equity financing from separate account investors and fund investors, which include pension funds, family offices, financial institutions, endowments and money managers. Our access to capital funding is uncertain. The current global economic crisis has resulted in a severe tightening of the credit markets as well as other sources of capital. Our inability to raise additional capital on terms reasonably acceptable to us could jeopardize the future success of our business.

The loss of one or more key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Our continued success is dependent to a significant degree upon the efforts of our senior executives, who have each been essential to our business. Certain of our executives have employment contracts with us that are renewable annually. The departure of all or any of our executives for whatever reason or the inability of all or any of them to continue to serve in their present capacities or our inability to attract and retain other qualified personnel could have a material adverse effect upon our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our executives have built highly regarded reputations in the real estate industry. Our executives attract business opportunities and assist both in negotiations with lenders and potential joint venture partners and in the representation of large and institutional clients. If we lost their services, our relationships with lenders, joint ventures and clients would diminish significantly.

In addition, certain of our officers have strong regional reputations and they aid in attracting and identifying opportunities and negotiating for us and on behalf of our clients. In particular, we view the establishment and

 

12


Table of Contents

maintenance of strong relationships through certain officers as critical to our success in the Japanese market. As we continue to grow, our success will be largely dependent upon our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel in all areas of business. We cannot be sure that we will be able to continue to hire and retain a sufficient number of qualified personnel to support or keep pace with planned growth.

Our revenues and earnings may be materially and adversely affected by fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates due to our international operations.

Our revenues from non-U.S. operations have been primarily denominated in the local currency where the associated revenues were earned. Thus, we may experience significant fluctuations in revenues and earnings because of corresponding fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. To date, our foreign currency exposure has been limited to the Japanese Yen. Due to the constantly changing currency exposures to which we will be subject and the volatility of currency exchange rates, there can be no assurance that we will not experience currency losses in the future, nor can we predict the effect of exchange rate fluctuations upon future operating results. Our management may decide to use currency hedging instruments from time to time including foreign currency forward contracts, purchased currency options (where applicable) and foreign currency borrowings. The economic risks associated with these hedging instruments include unexpected fluctuations in inflation rates, which could impact cash flow relative to paying down debt, and unexpected changes in our underlying net asset position. There can be no assurance that any hedging will be effective.

Our operating results are subject to significant volatility from quarter to quarter as a result of the varied timing and magnitude of our strategic acquisitions and dispositions.

We have experienced a fluctuation in our financial performance from quarter to quarter due in part to the significance of revenues from the sales of real estate on overall performance. The timing of purchases and sales of our real estate investments has varied, and will continue to vary, widely from quarter to quarter due to variability in market opportunities, changes in interest rates, and the overall demand for residential and commercial real estate, among other things. While these factors have contributed to us experiencing increased operating income and earnings in the fourth quarter in past years, there can be no assurance that we will continue to perform better in the fourth quarter.

In addition, the timing and magnitude of brokerage commissions paid to us may vary widely from quarter to quarter depending upon overall activity in the general real estate market and the nature of our brokerage assignments, among other things.

We have in the past and may continue in the future to incur significant amounts of debt to finance acquisitions, which could negatively affect our cash flows and subject our properties or other assets to the risk of foreclosure.

We have historically financed new acquisitions and property purchases with cash derived from secured and unsecured loans and lines of credit. For instance, we typically purchase real property with loans secured by a mortgage on the property acquired. We anticipate continuing this trend. We do not have a policy limiting the amount of debt that we may incur. Accordingly, our management and board of directors have discretion to increase the amount of our outstanding debt at any time. We could become more highly leveraged, resulting in an increase in debt service costs that could adversely affect results of operations and increase the risk of default on debt.

Much of our debt bears interest at variable rates. As a result, we are subject to fluctuating interest rates that may impact, adversely or otherwise, results of operations and cash flows. We may be subject to risks normally associated with debt financing, including the risk that cash flow will be insufficient to make required payments of principal and interest, and the risk that existing indebtedness on our properties will not be able to be refinanced or that the terms of available new financing will not be as favorable as the terms of existing indebtedness. If we are unable to satisfy the obligations owed to any lender with a lien on one of our properties, the lender could foreclose on the real property or other assets securing the loan and we would lose that property or asset. The loss of any property or asset to foreclosure could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

13


Table of Contents

Our debt obligations impose significant operating and financial restrictions, which may prevent us from pursuing certain business opportunities and taking certain actions.

Our debt obligations impose, and future debt obligations may impose, significant operating and financial restrictions on us. These restrictions limit or prohibit, among other things, our ability to:

 

   

incur additional indebtedness;

 

   

repay indebtedness (including the notes) prior to stated maturities;

 

   

pay dividends on, redeem or repurchase our stock or make other distributions;

 

   

make acquisitions or investments;

 

   

create or incur liens;

 

   

transfer or sell certain assets or merge or consolidate with or into other companies;

 

   

enter into certain transactions with affiliates;

 

   

sell stock in our subsidiaries;

 

   

restrict dividends, distributions or other payments from our subsidiaries; and

 

   

otherwise conduct necessary corporate activities.

In addition, our senior secured and one of our unsecured credit facilities require us to maintain compliance with specified financial covenants.

These covenants could adversely affect our ability to finance our future operations or capital needs and pursue available business opportunities. A breach of any of these covenants could result in a default in respect of the related indebtedness. If a default occurs, the relevant lenders could elect to declare the indebtedness, together with accrued interest and other fees, to be immediately due and payable and proceed against any collateral securing that indebtedness. Acceleration of our other indebtedness could result in a default under the terms of the indenture governing the notes.

We have guaranteed a number of loans in connection with various joint venture partnerships which may result in us being obligated to make substantial payments.

We have provided guarantees associated with loans secured by assets held in various joint venture partnerships. The maximum potential amount of future payments (undiscounted) we could be required to make under the guarantees was approximately $35 million at December 31, 2009. The guarantees expire by the year end of 2011 and our performance under the guarantees would be required to the extent there is a shortfall in liquidation between the principal amount of the loan and the net sales proceeds of the property. If we were to become obligated to perform on these guarantees, it could have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

We may incur expenses associated with defending law suits filed by former holders of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. stock.

On November 13, 2009, our wholly owned subsidiary, KW Merger Sub Corp., merged with and into Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. Prior to the merger, a small percentage of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.’s outstanding common stock was owned by holders who were not known to our management. If one or more of these holders were to bring a claim alleging that members of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.’s board of directors breached their fiduciary duties in connection with approving the merger, we would incur costs defending and/or settling such claim.

 

14


Table of Contents

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock

Our directors and officers and their affiliates are significant stockholders, which makes it possible for them to have significant influence over the outcome of all matters submitted to stockholders for approval and which influence may be in conflict with our interests and the interests of our other stockholders.

As of May 28, 2010, our directors and executive officers and their respective affiliates owned an aggregate of approximately 49.2% of the outstanding shares of our common stock. Our directors and executive officers and their respective affiliates also hold warrants which, if exercised, will give them greater control of us. These stockholders will have significant influence over the outcome of all matters submitted for stockholder approval, including the election of our directors and other corporate actions. In addition, such influence by one or more of these affiliates could have the effect of discouraging others from attempting to purchase or take us over and/or reducing the market price offered for our common stock in such an event.

We may issue additional equity securities which may dilute your interest in us.

In order to expand our business, we may consider offering and issuing additional equity or equity-based securities. Holders of our securities may experience a dilution in the net tangible book value per share held by them if this occurs. The number of shares that we may issue for cash without stockholder approval will be limited by the rules of the American Stock Exchange or other exchange on which our securities are listed. However, there are generally exceptions which allow companies to issue a limited number of equity securities without stockholder approval which would dilute your ownership.

The ownership interest of our current stockholders will be substantially diluted if the Guardian Note or our Series A Preferred Stock is converted.

In connection with our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., a convertible subordinated note, or the Guardian Note, with a principal amount of $30 million that was issued by Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. to Guardian Life Insurance Company of America, or Guardian, in November 2008 became convertible into shares of our common stock pursuant to the terms of the Guardian Note. The Guardian Note bears interest at a fixed rate of 7% payable quarterly and the outstanding balance of the Guardian Note is due on November 3, 2018. Guardian has the option to convert, in whole or in part, the outstanding principal balance and accrued interest of the Guardian Note into common stock at a conversion price of $9.86 per share any time prior to May 3, 2017. As of May 4, 2010, the outstanding principal balance and accrued interest of the Guardian Note were $30 million and $0, respectively. As of May 4, 2010 the estimated number of shares of common stock into which the Guardian Note will be convertible is 3,042,466. In addition, as of June 8, 2010, we had 100,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock outstanding which are convertible at any time on or prior to May 19, 2015, into a maximum of 8,058,018 shares of common stock, subject to adjustment. On May 19, 2015, all outstanding shares of Series A Preferred Stock will automatically be converted into shares of common stock. To the extent the Guardian Note or our Series A Preferred Stock is converted, additional shares of our common stock will be issued, which will result in dilution to our stockholders and increase the number of shares of common stock eligible for resale into the public market. Sales of such shares of common stock could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

If the benefits of our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. do not meet the expectations of financial or industry analysts, the market price of our common stock may decline.

The market price of our common stock may decline as a result of the merger if:

 

   

we do not achieve the perceived benefits of the merger as rapidly, or to the extent anticipated by, financial or industry analysts; or

 

   

the effect of the merger on our financial results is not consistent with the expectations of financial or industry analysts.

 

15


Table of Contents

Accordingly, our stockholders may experience a loss as a result of a decline in the market price of our common stock. In addition, a decline in the market price of our common stock could adversely affect our ability to issue additional securities and our ability to obtain additional financing in the future.

The price of our common stock may be volatile.

The price of our common stock may be volatile due to factors such as:

 

   

changes in real estate prices;

 

   

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly and annual results and those of our publicly held competitors;

 

   

mergers and strategic alliances among any real estate companies;

 

   

market conditions in the industry;

 

   

changes in government regulation and taxes;

 

   

shortfalls in our operating results from levels forecasted by securities analysts;

 

   

investor sentiment toward the stock of real estate companies in general;

 

   

announcements concerning us or our competitors; and

 

   

the general state of the securities markets.

Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. has not recently operated as a “reporting company.” Fulfilling our obligations as a “reporting company” going forward will be expensive and time consuming.

Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. has not been a public reporting company since 2004 and since that time has not been required to document and assess the effectiveness of its internal control procedures in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Although we have maintained disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting as required under the federal securities laws with respect to our activities, Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. has not been required to establish and maintain such disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting which are required with respect to a public company with substantial operations. Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the related rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, our management will be required to implement additional corporate governance practices and to adhere to a variety of reporting requirements and accounting rules. Compliance with these obligations will require significant time and resources from our management, finance and accounting staff and will significantly increase our legal, insurance and financial compliance costs. As a result of the increased costs associated with being a “reporting company,” Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.’s operating income as a percentage of revenue is likely to be lower.

Our common stock may be delisted, which could limit your ability to trade our common stock and subject us to additional trading restrictions.

Our common stock is listed on the NYSE, a national securities exchange. We cannot assure you that our common stock will continue to be listed on the NYSE in the future. If the NYSE delists our common stock from trading on its exchange, we could face significant material adverse consequences, including:

 

   

a limited availability of market quotations for our common stock;

 

   

a limited amount of news and analyst coverage for our Company;

 

16


Table of Contents
   

a decreased ability for us to issue additional securities or obtain additional financing in the future; and

 

   

limited liquidity for our stockholders due to thin trading.

Our staggered board may entrench management and discourage unsolicited stockholder proposals that may be in the best interests of stockholders and certain anti-takeover provisions in our organizational documents may discourage a change in control.

Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides for our board of directors to be divided into three classes, each of which generally serves for a term of three years with only one class of directors being elected in each year. As a result, at any annual meeting only a minority of the board of directors will be considered for election. Since this “staggered board” would prevent our stockholders from replacing a majority of our board of directors at any annual meeting, it may entrench management and discourage unsolicited stockholder proposals that may be in the best interests of stockholders. Additionally, certain provisions of our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws may have an anti-takeover effect and may delay, defer or prevent a tender offer or takeover attempt that a stockholder might consider in its best interest, including those attempts that might result in a premium over the market price for the shares held by stockholders.

In addition, Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, or DGCL, may, under certain circumstances, make it more difficult for a person who would be an “interested stockholder,” which is defined generally as a person with 15% or more of a corporation’s outstanding voting stock, to effect a “business combination” with the corporation for a three-year period. A “business combination” is defined generally as mergers, consolidations and certain other transactions, including sales, leases or other dispositions of assets with an aggregate market value equal to 10% or more of the aggregate market value of the corporation.

These anti-takeover provisions could make it more difficult for a third-party to acquire us, even if the third-party’s offer may be considered beneficial by many stockholders. As a result, stockholders may be limited in their ability to obtain a premium for their shares.

 

17


Table of Contents

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

The statements contained in this prospectus that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements. Our forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding our or our management’s expectations, hopes, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future. In addition, any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. The words “anticipates,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “possible,” “potential,” “predicts,” “project,” “should,” “would” and similar expressions may identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking.

The forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus are based on our current expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and their potential effects on us. There can be no assurance that future developments affecting us will be those that we have anticipated. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties (some of which are beyond our control) or other assumptions that may cause actual results or performance to be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, risks relating to: (1) difficulties encountered in integrating the merged companies; (2) officers and directors allocating their time to other businesses and potentially having conflicts of interest with our business; (3) success in retaining or recruiting, or changes required in, our officers, key employees or directors; (4) the potential liquidity and trading of our public securities; (5) our revenues and operating performance; (6) changes in overall economic conditions; (7) our ability to raise and successfully invest additional capital; (8) risks and costs associated with complying with corporate governance regulation and disclosure obligations (including pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002); (9) the conversion of the Guardian Note or our Series A Preferred Stock; (10) our obligations pursuant to the Guardian Note which may negatively affect our financial position and results of operations; and (11) other risks listed under the heading “Risk Factors.”

Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should any of our assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary in material respects from those projected in these forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable securities laws.

 

18


Table of Contents

USE OF PROCEEDS

This prospectus relates to 4,993,471 warrants and 20,278,690 shares of common stock that the Selling Security Holders are offering that may be sold from time to time. The shares of common stock being offered under this prospectus by the Selling Security Holders include (i) 4,993,471 shares of common stock underlying warrants purchased by our founding stockholders, (ii) 10,666,529 shares of common stock underlying warrants issued in our initial public offering pursuant to a prospectus dated November 14, 2007, and (iii) 4,618,690 shares of common stock purchased by our founding stockholders in a private placement and issued to certain of our officers and directors in connection with our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.

We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the shares under this prospectus made by the Selling Security Holders, although we could receive up to $62,418,387.50 upon the exercise of all of the warrants held by the Selling Security Holders and $133,331,612.50 upon the exercise of all of the outstanding warrants issued in our initial public offering pursuant to a prospectus dated November 14, 2007. Any amounts we receive from such exercises will be used for general working capital purposes.

 

19


Table of Contents

PRICE RANGE OF COMMON STOCK

From December 3, 2007 to March 18, 2010, our common stock traded on the NYSE Amex. Since March 19, 2010, our common stock has traded on the NYSE under the symbol “KW”. There is no established public market for our warrants. The following table sets forth, for the calendar quarter indicated, the high and low sales prices per share of common stock as reported on the NYSE Amex and the NYSE. The quotations listed below reflect interdealer prices, without retail markup, markdown or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

     Common Stock

Quarter Ended

   High    Low

2010

     

First Quarter

   $ 10.40    $ 8.58

2009

     

First Quarter

   $ 9.46    $ 9.20

Second Quarter

   $ 9.67    $ 9.49

Third Quarter

   $ 9.94    $ 9.67

Fourth Quarter

   $ 10.25    $ 8.85

2008

     

First Quarter

   $ 9.20    $ 8.97

Second Quarter

   $ 9.31    $ 9.05

Third Quarter

   $ 9.50    $ 9.01

Fourth Quarter

   $ 9.15    $ 8.56

The last reported sale price for our common stock on the NYSE on May 28, 2010 was $11.03 per share. As of May 27, 2010, we had 40 holders of record of our common stock and six holders of record of our warrants.

DIVIDEND POLICY

We have not paid any dividends on our common stock to date. The payment of any dividends is within the discretion of our board of directors. It is the present intention of our board of directors to retain all earnings, if any, for use in our business operations and, accordingly, our board of directors currently does not anticipate declaring any dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

Cumulative dividends on our Series A Preferred Stock accrue at an annual rate of 6% of the purchase price, subject to adjustment under certain circumstances. The dividends are payable quarterly in arrears when, as and if declared by the Board of Directors.

 

20


Table of Contents

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

We derived the selected consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007 and the selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2009 and 2008 from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. We derived the selected consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005 and the selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 from our audited consolidated financial statements which are not included in this prospectus. We derived the summary consolidated statements of operations data for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and March 31, 2009 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of March 31, 2010 from our unaudited consolidated interim financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. We have prepared the unaudited consolidated interim financial statements on the same basis as our audited financial statements and, in our opinion, have included all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly in all material respects our financial position and results of operations. The results for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the full year. Additionally, our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results expected for any future period.

You should read the selected historical financial data together with the consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this prospectus, as well as “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the other financial information included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     Three Months Ended March 31,     Year Ended December 31,
     2010     2009     2009     2008    2007    2006    2005
     (Unaudited)                           

Statements of operations data:

                 

Revenue

   $ 10,826,000      $ 12,483,000      $ 86,235,000      $ 32,225,000    $ 33,393,000    $ 26,498,000    $ 41,753,000

Merger-related operating expenses

     —          —          16,120,000        —        —        —        —  

Other operating expenses

     14,871,000        11,942,000        78,752,000        32,571,000      43,180,000      34,606,000      57,356,000

Equity in joint venture income (loss)

     1,308,000        (192,000     8,019,000        10,097,000      27,433,000      14,689,000      35,855,000

(Loss) income from continuing operations

     (2,572,000     (1,459,000     (9,657,000 )     667,000      9,037,000      6,541,000      10,990,000

(Loss) earnings per share from continuing operations

   $ (0.08   $ (0.06   $ (0.36 )   $ 0.03    $ 0.47    $ 0.36    $ 0.20

 

          As of December 31,
     As of March 31, 2010    2009    2008    2007    2006    2005
     (Unaudited)                         

Balance sheet data:

                 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 43,729,000    $ 57,784,000    $ 25,831,000    $ 24,248,000    $ 15,332,000    19,424,000

Investments in real estate and joint ventures

     239,008,000      228,305,000      190,915,000      80,026,000      57,744,000    36,847,000

Total assets

     333,354,000      336,257,000      255,883,000      145,814,000      107,746,000    93,461,000

Debt

     127,083,000      127,573,000      131,423,000      65,084,000      40,517,000    33,746,000

Kennedy-Wilson equity

     175,893,000      177,314,000      105,551,000      56,857,000      49,447,000    42,120,000

Total equity

     176,406,000      179,336,000      105,802,000      57,076,000      49,603,000    42,120,000

 

21


Table of Contents

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our historical financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. This discussion contains forward-looking statements that are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties. Actual results and timing of events may differ significantly from those expressed or implied in such forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, including those set forth in the section entitled “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus. See “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements.” Unless specifically noted otherwise, as used throughout this Management’s Discussion and Analysis section, “we,” “our,” or “us” refers to the business, operations and financial results of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and its subsidiaries prior to, and Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries subsequent to, the closing of the Merger (as defined below) as the context requires. “Prospect” refers to the operations or financial results of Prospect Acquisition Corp. prior to the closing of the Merger.

Overview

We are a diversified, international real estate company that provides investment and real estate services. We have grown from an auction business in one office into a vertically-integrated operating company with over 300 professionals in 22 offices throughout the U.S. and Japan. We are an industry leader, currently owning real estate (through our closed-end funds, joint ventures, and wholly and majority owned entities) and managing over 40 million square feet of residential, multifamily and commercial real estate, including 10,000 apartment units, throughout the U.S. and Japan. Our operations are defined by two core business units: KW Investments and KW Services.

On November 13, 2009, the stockholders of Prospect approved a merger with KWI, whereby KWI became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Prospect, which was renamed Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. (the “Merger”). The directors and officers of KWI immediately before the Merger became our directors and officers, except that one of the KWI directors immediately before the Merger resigned and was replaced by a director from Prospect.

Pursuant to the Merger agreement, common stockholders of KWI received as consideration 20,401,018 shares of Prospect’s common stock and preferred stockholders of KWI received as consideration 5,598,982 shares of Prospect’s common stock, for an aggregate consideration of 26 million shares of Prospect common stock. In addition, 2,475,000 shares of Prospect common stock were reserved for issuance to our employees, nonemployees and management pursuant to an equity compensation plan adopted by Prospect’s board of directors and approved by Prospect’s stockholders on November 13, 2009. In connection with the Merger noted below, the assets, liabilities and results of operations of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. (“KWI”) have become the historical financial statements of Prospect and, accordingly, KWI’s operations for the full year ended December 31, 2007 have been included.

When reading our financial statements and the information included in this section, it should be considered that we have experienced, and continue to experience, the same material trends that have affected the nation, and therefore, our operations and financial condition. It is, therefore, a challenge to predict our future performance based on our historical results, but we believe that the following material trends assist in understanding the variability of our historical earnings and cash flows and the potential for the future:

Macroeconomic Conditions

Our business is closely tied to general economic conditions and the real estate industry. As a result, our economic performance, the value of our real estate and real estate secured notes, and our ability to implement our business strategies may be affected by changes in national and local economic conditions. The condition of the real estate markets in which we operate tends to be cyclical and is related to the

 

22


Table of Contents

condition of the economy in the U.S. and Japan as a whole and to the perceptions of investors of the overall economic outlook. Rising interest rates, declining demand for real estate or periods of general economic slowdown or recession have had a direct negative impact on the real estate market in the past and a recurrence of these conditions in the U.S. or a deeper recession in Japan could result in a reduction in our revenues. In addition, the economic condition of each local market where we operate may be dependent on one or more industries.

We have experienced in past years, are currently experiencing, and expect in the future to be negatively impacted by, periods of economic slowdown or recession, and corresponding declines in the demand for real estate and related services, within the markets in which we operate. The current economic recession has been extraordinary for its worldwide scope, its severity and its impact on major financial institutions, among other aspects. The current recession and the downturn in the real estate market has resulted in and/or may result in: a general decline in rents due to defaulting tenants or less favorable terms for renewed or new leases; fewer purchases and sales of properties by clients, resulting in a decrease in property management fees and brokerage commissions; a decline in actual and projected sale prices of our properties resulting in lower returns on the properties in which we have invested; higher interest rates, higher loan costs, less desirable loan terms and a reduction in the availability of mortgage loans and mezzanine financing, all of which could increase costs and could limit our ability to acquire additional real estate assets; and a decrease in the availability of lines of credit and other sources of capital used to purchase real estate investments and distressed notes.

Beginning in 2003, economic conditions in the United States rebounded from the economic downturn in 2001 and 2002. The recovery, which positively impacted the commercial and residential real estate markets generally, continued through the second quarter of 2007, helping to improve the revenue in our services segment, particularly leasing and brokerage revenue. Improved economic conditions also resulted in a general increase in transaction activity, higher occupancy levels, rental rates, and property values, helping to increase the income in the our investments segment as several of our real estate investments were sold.

Since the third quarter of 2007, U.S. economic activity has progressively weakened due initially to stresses in the residential housing and financial sectors and the impact of sharply higher energy costs. The weakening economic activity developed into a recession, affecting all segments of the economy, in early 2008, as both consumer and business spending dropped. This weakening economic activity, coupled with capital market stresses, led to a global financial disruption in the third quarter of 2008, the consequences of which have continued through the end of 2009. This disruption caused credit markets to freeze up, investors to become more risk averse and assets of all types, from the riskiest to the most secure, to lose value. These conditions also caused the economy to contract further and job losses to accelerate throughout 2008 and 2009. This has resulted in a decline in leasing activity and space absorption, rising vacancy rates and decreasing rents across the United States, which in turn, has reduced our services revenue, particularly leasing and brokerage revenue. Investment sales activity in the United States has been falling sharply from peak levels in 2007 and has continued to decline through the end of 2009. This decline is the result of an absence of debt financing, weakening property fundamentals, and the re-pricing of risk in the face of economic and market uncertainty. The deteriorating conditions adversely affected our investments segment throughout 2008 and 2009 as property values decreased sharply and disposition opportunities were markedly reduced.

The current economic downturn has also significantly affected countries throughout Asia, including Japan. The worldwide recession has led to falling stock prices and asset values in Asia and reduced economic growth prospects in Asia. Several property markets in Asia have been affected by real estate developments that resulted in an oversupply of completed or partially completed space. Property prices have fallen along with prices of other investments and asset values. These conditions have resulted in a decline in our investment sales and investment activities in Japan beginning in late 2008 and continuing through the end of 2009.

A rebound of our services and investments segments are expected, but contingent on, among other things, the U.S. and Japanese economies resuming their growth and credit markets attaining stability and

 

23


Table of Contents

predictability over a sustained period. We are sensitive to the challenges of the current economic climate and as a vertically integrated company, we have the in-house expertise and skill sets to navigate through these challenging times by taking advantage of opportunities in real estate and the capital markets. We have been implementing and continue to implement cost-savings measures across our business lines to maximize our competitive position.

International Operations

We have made investments in Asia, particularly in Japan, and plan to expand our operations and investments in Japan and selected markets throughout Asia in the future. If we are successful in implementing this strategy, the increased scope of our international operations may lead to more volatile financial results and difficulties in managing our businesses. This volatility and difficulty could be caused by, among other things, the following: currency fluctuations, restrictions and problems relating to the repatriation of profits; difficulties and costs of staffing and managing international operations; the burden of complying with multiple and potentially conflicting laws; laws restricting foreign companies from conducting business and unexpected changes in regulatory requirements; the impact of different business cycles and economic instability; political instability and civil unrest; greater difficulty in perfecting our security interests, collecting accounts receivable, foreclosing on security and protecting our interests as a creditor in bankruptcies in certain geographic regions; potentially adverse tax consequences; share ownership restrictions on foreign operations; Japanese property and income taxes, tax withholdings and tariffs; and geographic, time zone, language and cultural differences between personnel in different areas of the world.

Our revenues from non-U.S. operations have been primarily denominated in the local currency where the associated revenues were earned. Thus, we may experience significant fluctuations in revenues and earnings because of corresponding fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. To date, our foreign currency exposure has been limited to the Japanese Yen. Due to the constantly changing currency exposures to which we will be subject and the volatility of currency exchange rates, there can be no assurance that we will not experience currency losses in the future, nor can we predict the effect of exchange rate fluctuations upon future operating results. Our management may decide to use currency hedging instruments from time to time including foreign currency forward contracts, purchased currency options (where applicable) and foreign currency borrowings. The economic risks associated with these hedging instruments include unexpected fluctuations in inflation rates, which could impact cash flow relative to paying down debt, and unexpected changes in our underlying net asset position. There can be no assurance that any hedging will be effective.

Acquisitions, Dispositions, and Financings

Acquisitions

During 2009 and 2010, we completed the following acquisition transactions:

 

   

Also in May 2010, we, in a partnership with PCCP, acquired a large apartment complex in Northern California and assumed the existing financing.

 

   

In May 2010, we purchased a discounted non-performing note secured by a parcel of land in Hawaii. The unpaid balance on the note was $5.85 million at the time of acquisition. The note was subsequently foreclosed on.

 

   

In April 2010, the board of directors approved the repurchase of up to 7.5 million warrants, we repurchased 2,090,000 warrants for a total amount of $2.7 million.

 

   

Also in April 2010, we acquired a $41 million loan portfolio from a large regional bank. The acquisition included seller financing and a profit sharing agreement between us and the selling bank.

 

24


Table of Contents
   

In February 2010, we, in partnership with Deutsche Bank, acquired a loan portfolio totaling approximately $342 million in unpaid principal balance. The loan portfolio, which was acquired from a large regional bank, is comprised of loans secured by residential, hotel, retail, office, land, multifamily, and other assets predominantly located in Sothern California.

 

   

In December 2009, we purchased a discounted non-performing note on a condominium project and adjacent land in Costa Mesa, California. The unpaid principal balance on the note was $19.5 million at the time of acquisition.

 

   

In June 2009, we acquired 149 condominium units for $33.5 million in a renovated condominium tower in Los Angeles, California.

Dispositions

During 2009 and 2010, we completed the following disposition transactions:

 

   

In May 2009, we sold a multifamily property in Napa, California to KW Property Fund III for a net gain of $0.5 million. The property was originally owned in a joint venture partnership between us and Hanover Financial. In December 2008, we acquired Hanover’s interest in the property.

 

   

In March 2009, we sold 136 vacant, finished lots in Lancaster, California for $6.3 million to KW Property Fund III. The lots are planned for single family detached homes.

 

   

During 2009, we sold 138 of the 149 condominium units that were acquired in June 2009. The net gain generated on the sales after expenses was $16.5 million. In 2010, the remaining 11 units were sold generating a net gain of $1.2 million.

Financings

 

   

On May 21, 2010 and June 8, 2010, we sold and issued an aggregate of 100,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock for a total purchase price of $100,000,000.

 

   

During 2009, we entered into a $28 million loan agreement with Pacific Western Bank. Principal and interest are payable monthly. The agreement calls for 59 monthly payments of principal in the amount of $467,000 and bears interest at the lender’s base rate, which was 4% at December 31, 2009. The note can be prepaid at any time without a prepayment penalty.

 

   

During 2008, before preferred shares were converted to common shares and the shares were recast to match the presentation of Prospect in connection with the Merger, we issued 53,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock (the “preferred stock”). The proceeds from the issuance of the preferred stock were $52,354,000, net of expenses related to the offering totaling $646,000. The holders of the preferred stock were entitled to receive dividends quarterly at a per annum rate equal to 7% of the liquidation value of $1,000 per share. The preferred stock had conversion price of $42 per share. In connection with the Merger the preferred stock was converted to common stock and the executed conversion price was changed to $36 per share. The change in conversion price resulted in the issuance of additional shares to pre-Merger preferred shareholders in the amount of $7,879,000. In addition, cash dividend payments to pre-Merger preferred shareholders for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008 of $3,235,000 and $2,264,000, respectively.

 

   

We have entered into a loan agreement with US Bank and East-West Bank that provides us with an unsecured revolving credit facility for use in acquisitions and for working capital purposes in the

 

25


Table of Contents
 

amount of $30 million. The loan bears interest at a range of rates from prime to prime plus 0.50%, or, at the borrower’s option, LIBOR plus 2.50% to LIBOR plus 3.00%. During 2009, the average outstanding borrowings under the line of credit were $19.1 million with the high and low outstanding balances being $26.0 million and $10.0 million, respectively. During 2008, the average outstanding borrowings under the line of credit were $3.4 million with the high and low outstanding balances being $18.5 million and $0 million, respectively. The borrowings under this loan had interest rates ranging from 3.25% to 4.50% and 3.75% to 5.50% at December 31, 2009, and December 31, 2008, respectively. The principal amount outstanding under this loan was $10,000,000 at December 31, 2009 and $13,500,000 at December 31, 2008. The loan matures in June 2011.

 

   

In November 2008, we issued a convertible subordinated note with a principal amount of $30 million to Guardian. The note bears interest at a fixed rate of 7%. Interest is payable quarterly with the outstanding principal due in November 2018. The holder of the note may convert the note, in whole or in part, into common stock of ours at a conversion price of $10.52 per (as adjusted for the Merger) share of common stock at any time prior to the tenth anniversary of the original issue date of the note. On October 8, 2009, we and Guardian entered into a letter agreement pursuant to which the parties agreed to amend the Guardian Note, effective only if the Merger consummated, to change the conversion price to $9.86 per share and the expiration date for the conversion period to May 3, 2017. At any time on or after the ninth anniversary of the original issue date of the note and prior to the due date, we may demand that the holder of the note convert the note in accordance with the terms of the note.

 

   

In 2007, we issued junior subordinated debentures with an aggregate principal amount of $40 million. The debentures were issued to a trust established by us, which contemporaneously issued $40 million of trust preferred securities to Merrill Lynch International. The interest rate on the debentures is fixed for the first ten years at 9.06%, and variable thereafter at LIBOR plus 3.70%. Interest is payable quarterly with the principal due in 2037.

Critical Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation—The consolidated financial statements include our accounts and the accounts of our wholly owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. In addition, we evaluate our relationships with other entities to identify whether they are variable interest entities as defined by FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Subtopic 810-10 and to assess whether we are the primary beneficiary of such entities. If the determination is made that we are the primary beneficiary, then that entity is consolidated in the consolidated financial statements. The ownership of the other interest holders of consolidated subsidiaries is reflected as noncontrolling interests.

Revenue Recognition—Management and leasing fees and commissions revenues are accounted for in accordance with the provisions of Revenue Recognition ASC Subtopic 605-10. Management fees for property and asset management are recognized over time as earned based upon the terms of the management agreement. Leasing fees that are payable upon tenant occupancy, payment of rent or other events beyond our control are recognized upon the occurrence of such events. In the case of real estate sales commissions, this generally occurs when escrow closes. In accordance with the guidelines established for Reporting Revenue Gross as a Principal versus Net as an Agent in the ASC Subtopic 605-45, we record commission revenues and expenses on a gross basis. Of the criteria listed in the Subtopic 605-45, we are the primary obligor in the transaction, do not have inventory risk, perform all, or part, of the service, have credit risk, and have wide latitude in establishing the price of services rendered and discretion in selection of agents and determination of service specifications.

 

26


Table of Contents

Sales of real estate are recognized at the close of escrow when title to the real property passes to the buyer. We follow the requirements for profit recognition as set forth by the Sale of Real Estate ASC Subtopic 360-20.

Investments in Joint Ventures—We have a number of joint venture interests, generally ranging from 5% to 15% (but occasionally up to 50%), that were formed to acquire, manage, develop and/or sell real estate. Investments in joint ventures which we do not control are accounted for under the equity method of accounting as we can exercise significant influence, but do not have the ability to control the joint venture. An investment in joint ventures is recorded at its initial investment plus or minus our share of undistributed income or loss and less distributions. Declines in value of our investment in joint ventures that are other than temporary are recognized when evidence indicates that such a decline has occurred.

Profit on the sales of real estate held by joint ventures that have continuing involvement are deferred until such time that the continuing involvement has been resolved and all the risks and rewards of ownership have passed to the buyer. Profit on sales to joint ventures in which we retain an equity ownership interest results in partial sales treatment in accordance with the provisions of the Sale of Real Estate ASC Subtopic 360-20, thus deferring a portion of the gain on our continuing ownership percentage in the joint ventures.

Joint venture investments in notes receivable recognize revenues on an effective interest basis under the provisions of ASC Subtopic 310-20 whereby estimated cash proceeds are accreted into interest income over the estimated holding period. When the future cash flows of a note can not be reasonably estimated, cash payments are applied to the cost basis until fully recovered before any revenue is recognized.

One of our investments in joint ventures, KW Property Fund III, L.P. is, for GAAP purposes, an investment company under the AICPA Audit and Accounting Guide Investment Companies. Thus, the fund reflects its investments at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses resulting from changes in fair value reflected in earnings. We have retained the specialized accounting for the fund pursuant to Retention of Specialized Accounting for Investments in Consolidation ASC Subtopic 810-10 in recording our equity in joint venture income from the fund.

Fair Value Measurements—We account for fair value measurements of financial assets and financial liabilities and for fair value measurements of nonfinancial items that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis under the provisions of ASC Subtopic 820-10. Subtopic 820-10 defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.

Goodwill—Goodwill results from the difference between the purchase price and the fair value of net assets acquired based upon the purchase method of accounting for business combinations. In accordance with Accounting for Goodwill ASC Subtopic 350-20, goodwill is no longer amortized, but instead is reviewed for impairment at least annually by our management. In testing for impairment in accordance with ASC Subtopic 350-20, goodwill is assigned to the reporting unit based upon the amount of goodwill generated at the time of acquisition of the businesses by the reporting unit. An earnings multiple appropriate to the respective reporting unit was applied to the cash basis net operating income of the reporting unit. This process enables a fair approximation of the reporting unit’s value, which is then compared to the net book value of the reporting unit. As a result of the evaluation performed of our goodwill as described above, we have determined that there was no goodwill impairment as of December 31, 2009, 2008 or 2007.

Long-Lived Assets—We review our long-lived assets (excluding goodwill) whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable in accordance with Impairment of Long-Lived Assets ASC Subtopic 360-10. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its estimated future cash flows, an impairment charge is recognized in the amount by which the carrying

 

27


Table of Contents

amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Assets to be disposed of would be separately presented in the balance sheet and reported at the lower of the carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell, and are no longer depreciated. The assets and liabilities of a disposal group classified as held for sale would be presented separately in the appropriate asset and liability sections of the balance sheet.

Discontinued Operations—We present components as discontinued operations if the operations and cash flows of the component have been or will be eliminated from the ongoing operations in a disposal transaction where we will not have any significant continuing involvement in the operations of the component after the disposal transaction. A component comprises operations and cash flows that can be clearly distinguished, operationally and for financial reporting purposes, from the rest of our Company. Because each of our real estate assets generally constitutes a discrete subsidiary, many assets that we hold for sale in the ordinary course of business must be reported as a discontinued operation unless we have significant continuing involvement in the operations of the asset after its disposition. Furthermore, operating profits and losses on such assets are required to be recognized and reported as operating profits and losses on discontinued operations in the periods in which they occur. Interest expense is only allocated to discontinued operations to the extent that the interest is specific to the component.

Noncontrolling Interests—We account for Noncontrolling Interests in accordance with Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements ASC Subtopic 810-10, which establishes accounting and reporting standards for a parent company’s noncontrolling interest in a subsidiary.

Share-Based Payment Arrangements—We account for our share-based payment arrangements under the provisions of Share-Based Payments ASC Subtopic 718-10. Compensation cost for employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments are based on the grant-date fair value of the share-based award that are ultimately settled in our equity. The costs of employee services are recognized over the period during which an employee provides service in exchange for the share-based payment award. Share-based payment arrangements that vest ratably over the requisite service period are recognized on the straight-line basis and performance awards that vest ratably are recognized on a tranche by tranche basis over the performance period. Unrecognized compensation costs for share-based payment arrangements that have been modified are recognized over the original service or performance period.

Fair Value Option—We account for financial assets and financial liabilities at fair value on an instrument-by-instrument basis, with changes in fair value reported in earnings in accordance with the provisions of Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures ASC Subtopic 820-10.

Income Taxes—Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. In accordance with Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes FASB Codification Subtopic 605-15, we recognize the effect of income tax positions only if those positions are more likely than not of being sustained. Recognized income tax positions are measured at the largest amount that is greater than 50% likely of being realized. Changes in recognition or measurement are reflected in the period in which the change in judgment occurs. We record interest related to unrecognized tax benefits in interest expense and penalties in selling, general, and administrative expenses.

Results of Operations

The following compares results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and March 31, 2009, as well as the years ended 2009, 2008, and 2007.

Our Consolidated Financial Results and Comparison for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and March 31, 2009

Our revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 were $10.8 million and $12.5 million, respectively. Total operating expenses for the same periods were $14.9 million and $11.9 million, respectively, and net loss attributable to our common shareholders was $3.1 million and $1.4 million, respectively.

 

28


Table of Contents

Revenues

Services Segment Revenues

During the three months ended March 31, 2010, management, leasing fees and commissions generated revenues of $6.2 million, representing 90% of our total revenue (not including sale of real estate), compared to approximately $5.6 million and 90% of total revenue (not including sale of real estate) for the same three month period in 2009. The increase is primarily attributable to higher auctions fees for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared to the same period in 2009. In addition, during the three months ended March 31, 2010, we earned a $0.4 million acquisition fee related to the acquisition of a loan portfolio in one of our new joint ventures.

Investments Segment Revenues

Rental and other income increased 6% to $0.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 from $0.6 million for the same three month period in 2009. Rental income includes rental and other income from properties, which we consolidate. The increase can be primarily attributed to increased occupancy at our rental properties.

Sale of real estate for the three months ended March 31, 2010 produced gross revenue of $3.9 million, compared to $6.3 million for the same three month period in 2009. The activity in the three months ended March 31, 2010 related to the sale of the remaining 11 condominium units in a project in Southern California as compared to the activity in the same period of 2009 which related to the sale of land in Southern California.

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2010 were approximately $12.2 million (not including cost of real estate sold), representing a $6.0 million increase over the same period in 2009. This increase was primarily due to $1.9 million of expenses associated with the 2009 Equity Participation Plan and $2.2 million of bonus expense incurred during the three months ended March 31, 2010.

Services Segment Operating Expenses

Commissions, marketing expenses, compensation and related expenses increased $5.2 million to $9.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010. This increase was primarily due to $1.9 million of expenses associated with the 2009 Equity Participation Plan and $2.2 million of bonus expense incurred during the three months ended March 31, 2010. Additionally, increased activity in the auction business during the three months ended March 31, 2010 also increased associated expenses.

Investments Segment Operating Expenses

Rental and other operating expenses were approximately $0.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009. Rental operating expense includes operating expenses from properties in which we hold a controlling interest.

Cost of real estate sold was $2.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 versus $5.8 million for the same three month period in 2009. The cost of real estate is associated to the sale condominium units and land previously discussed.

 

29


Table of Contents

Other Operating Expenses

General and administrative, depreciation and amortization expenses were $2.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010, an increase of 63% from $1.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2009. The increase can primarily be attributed to resources required to source new investments.

Investments Segment Equity in Joint Venture Income

Investments in joint ventures generated income of $1.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared to a loss of $0.2 million recorded in the same three month period in 2009. The difference can primarily be attributed to income generated from two new joint ventures, one formed at the end of 2009 to purchase a note secured by an interest in a condominium project in Southern California and the other during the three months ended March 31, 2010 to purchase a loan portfolio. Also, for the three months ended March 31, 2010, we recorded an other than temporary impairment of $0.4 million related to an investment in a condominium project in Seattle, Washington.

Non-Operating Items

Interest income was $0.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010, compared to $0.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2009. The change was due to higher interest income earned on increased bank deposits for the three months ending March 31, 2010 versus 2009. In addition, two new notes receivable from a related party property in Seattle, Washington were held for the three months ended March 31, 2010.

Interest expense was $2.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010, a decrease of 18% compared to $2.6 million for same three months period ended in 2009. The decrease can primarily be attributed to the repayment of debt during the three months ended March 31, 2009 that was replaced with new debt at more attractive rates.

The benefit from income taxes was approximately $2.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010, compared to the income tax provision of approximately $0.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2009. The change was due to decrease in income before provision for income taxes.

Net income of approximately $0.6 million attributable to noncontrolling interests in three properties was recognized for the three months ended March 31, 2010 compared to net loss of $0.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2009. The increase is primarily due to the allocation to the noncontrolling interest in income related to the sale of condominium units in Southern California.

Our Consolidated Financial Results and Comparison of the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008

Notwithstanding the current disarray in the capital markets, especially the debt and equity markets that most significantly affect real estate, we are uniquely positioned because we are a full service real estate operating company with the ability to take advantage of the opportunities arising from the current economic difficulties that affect real estate. In 2009, the general shortage of available equity and debt was overcome through our extensive relationships in the capital markets that allowed us to place debt for those properties that met our criteria as appropriate and potentially profit producing investments. This ability to properly provide for the capitalization of investments and our extensive relationships in the real estate markets enable us to acquire well located, income producing properties that are not distressed from owners that have distressed financial positions. Current economic conditions have not only made available to our Company excellent buying opportunities but also have provided additional opportunities for our real estate service groups such as our auction group and our asset and property management divisions where experience and professional excellence is being sought by distressed real estate owners. We are sensitive to the challenges of the current economic climate and as a vertically integrated company, we have the in-house expertise and skill sets to navigate through these challenging times by taking advantage of opportunities in real estate and the capital markets. We have been implementing and continue to implement cost-savings measures across our business lines to maximize our competitive position.

 

30


Table of Contents

Our revenues for the year ended December 31, 2009 and 2008 were $86.2 million and $32.2 million, respectively. Total operating expenses for the same periods were $93.7 million and $32.6 million, respectively. Net loss attributable to our common stockholders was $15.3 million in 2009 compared to net income of $0.6 million attributable to our common stockholders in 2008.

Revenues

Services Segment Revenues

For 2009, management and leasing generated revenues of $19.2 million (including related party fees of $10.1 million), representing 71% of our total revenue (not including sales of real estate), compared to approximately $19.1 million (including approximately $8.4 million in related party fees) and 59% of total revenue in 2008. Comparing the two years, management and leasing fees increased 1% which is due to increased asset management fees associated with new KW Funds and separate accounts. Management and leasing fees include asset management, construction management, leasing services, engineering and other services to property owners.

Commissions revenues in 2009 decreased to $4.9 million (including approximately $0.7 million in related party fees), representing 18% of total revenues (not including sales of real estate), compared to commission revenues in 2008 of $10.2 million (including related party fees of approximately $4.3 million). Acquisition fees decreased $4.3 million in 2009 as compared to 2008. The decrease can be attributed primarily to the current disarray in the debt and equity markets, which has caused a reduction in the acquisition of commercial and apartment properties and the related commissions and other acquisition fees revenue. Our brokerage activities provide clients and our Company with development and implementation of marketing plans, sealed bid auctions and open bid auctions.

Investments Segment Revenues

Rental income decreased 8% to $2.7 million in 2009 from $3.0 million in 2008. Rental income includes rental and other income from properties in which we hold a controlling interest. The decrease can be primarily attributed to the downtown in the economy and the rental markets.

Sale of real estate in 2009 produced gross revenue of $59.4 million related to the sale of condominium units and land in southern California.

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses in 2009 were approximately $52.9 million (not including cost of real estate sold), representing a $20.4 million increase over 2008. This increase was primarily due to $12.5 million of merger related costs.

Services Segment Operating Expenses

Commissions and marketing expenses increased to $3.4 million in 2009 from $2.8 million in 2008. The increase in commission expense corresponds to the higher percentage of auction fees in commission revenues in 2009 compared to 2008, which incur the majority of commission expenses. As noted above, commission revenue for 2008 included a greater component of acquisition fees, which incur a relatively minor portion of expenses. In addition, larger broker fees were paid to outside brokerage firms in 2009.

Compensation and related expenses were approximately $24.8 million in 2009, up 16% from $21.3 million in 2008. The increase is primarily due to amortization of the KWI 2009 Stock Option Plan and its replacement plan, the 2009 Equity Participation Plan. This increase was offset by a decrease in bonuses due to the decline in operating results as well as the reduction of staff in 2009.

 

31


Table of Contents

General and administrative expenses were $6.4 million in 2009, an increase of 5% from $6.1 million in 2008.

Investments Segment Operating Expenses

Rental operating expenses in 2009 and 2008 were approximately $1.1 million and $1.5 million, respectively, a decrease of 21% from 2008 to 2009. Rental operating expense includes operating expenses from properties, in which we hold a controlling interest. The decrease can be attributed to the sale of two properties in southern California in 2009.

Cost of real estate sold was $41.9 million in 2009 and relates to the disposition of condominium units and land in southern California. Cost of real estate sold was zero in 2008 as we did not recognize any sales on consolidated real estate.

Other Operating Expenses

Merger related expenses were $16.1 million in 2009, $12.5 million related to compensation and related expenses and $3.6 million related to general and administrative expenses. These are costs incurred in connection with the Merger.

Depreciation and amortization expense increased to $1.1 million in 2009, a 22% decrease from $0.9 million in 2008. The change was primarily due to the sale of an office building in southern California in 2008 and a full year of depreciation in 2009 from an apartment building in central California versus ten months in 2008.

Investments Segment Equity in Joint Venture Income

Investments in joint ventures generated income of $8.0 million in 2009, a decrease of 21% from income of $10.1 million recorded in 2008, due primarily to fair value gain of $5.9 million recognized in 2008.

Non-Operating Items

Interest and other income was $0.5 million in 2009, compared to $0.6 million in 2008. The change was due to lower interest income on bank and escrow deposits, which resulted from decrease in interest rates. In addition, a note receivable was paid off in the first half of 2008.

Interest expense was $13.2 million in 2009, an increase of 53% compared to $8.6 million for in 2008. The increase was due to interest expense on the debt incurred for the condominium project acquisition, a full year of interest on the central California apartment project, and the debt service on the $30 million subordinate convertible loan originated in November 2008.

Other than temporary impairment on available-for-sale security of $0.3 million in 2009 represents a decrease of 26% from $0.4 million in 2008. This amount represents the write-down of the value of a stock investment.

The benefit from income taxes was approximately $4.0 million in 2009, compared to the income tax provision of approximately $0.6 million in 2008. The change was due to decrease in income before provision for income taxes.

Net income of approximately $5.7 million attributable to a non-controlling interest in three properties was recognized in 2009 compared to net income of $0.1 million in 2008. The increase is primarily due to the allocation to the noncontrolling interest in the income related to the sale of the Mercury condominium units.

 

32


Table of Contents

Our Consolidated Financial Results and Comparison of years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007

Our revenues for the year ended December 31, 2008 and the year ended December 31, 2007 were $32.2 million and $33.4 million, respectively. Total operating expenses for the same periods were $32.6 million and $43.2 million, respectively. Operating income included equity in income of joint ventures of $10.1 million for 2008 and $27.4 million for 2007. Net income attributable to our common stockholders in 2008 was $0.6 million compared to net income attributable to our common stockholders of $9.4 million in 2007.

Revenue

Services Segment Revenues

In 2008, management and leasing generated revenue of $19.1 million (including related party fees of $8.4 million), representing 59% of our total revenue, compared to approximately $20.1 million (including related party fees of approximately $10.3 million) and 60% of total revenue in 2007. Management and leasing fees include asset management, construction management, leasing services, engineering and other services to property operators. Management fees and leasing fees, in aggregate, decreased by approximately 5%, which was primarily due to the decrease in the total number of multifamily properties under management. Lower interest rates and favorable loan terms resulted in an increased number of building sale transactions in 2007, including some of the buildings managed by our Company. Construction management fees declined primarily due to completion of major renovation projects.

Commissions revenue in 2008 decreased 22% to $10.2 million (including approximately $4.3 million in related party fees), representing 32% of total revenues compared to commission revenues in 2007 of $13.2 million (including related party fees of approximately $8.9 million), representing 39% of total revenue. Our brokerage activities provide clients and our Company with development and implementation of marketing plans, sealed bid auctions and open bid auctions. The increase in auction activity resulted in an increase of residential commissions of approximately $1.5 million in 2008. The decrease in transaction activity across all commercial asset classes led to a decrease of approximately $4.4 million in acquisition, disposition, and financing fees.

Investments Segment Revenues

Rental income increased to $3.0 million in 2008 from $100,000 in 2007. Rental income was 9% of total revenue in 2008. Rental income includes rental and other revenue from properties in which we have a controlling interest. The acquisition of several assets, including an office building in Japan and an apartment project in California, was the main cause for the increase in rental income.

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses in 2008 were approximately $32.6 million, representing a decrease of 25% from $43.2 million in 2007. The decrease in operating expenses was primarily due to a decrease in compensation and related expenses.

Services Segment Operating Expenses

Commissions and marketing expenses increased to $2.8 million in 2008 from $2.1 million in 2007. While most commission and marketing expenses decreased due to decreased commercial transactions, the auction commission and business development expenses combined increased by approximately $1 million.

 

33


Table of Contents

Compensation and related expenses were approximately $21.3 million in 2008, down 38% from $34.2 million in 2007. The change was primarily a result of large decreases in bonuses in 2008, offset by an increase in staff to meet the needs of the increased residential auction and fund management activities.

General and administrative expenses were $6.1 million in 2008, representing a 5% decrease from 2007 expenses of $6.4 million. The change was primarily due to the implementation of cost cutting measures in 2008.

Investments Segment Operating Expenses

Rental operating expense increased to $1.5 million in 2008 from $34,000 in 2007. Rental operating expense includes operating expenses from properties, in which we have controlling interest. The acquisition of several assets, including an office building in Japan and an apartment project in California, was the main cause for the increase in rental operating expense.

Other Operating Expenses

Depreciation and amortization expense was $0.9 million in 2008, compared to $0.5 million in 2007. The change was due to the acquisition of an apartment project in California.

Investments Segment Equity in Joint Venture Income

Equity in joint venture income totaled approximately $10.1 million in 2008, a decrease of 63% compared to $27.4 million recognized in 2007. The revenue from joint venture investments includes income from the operation and sale of numerous real estate investments in the U.S. which are owned primarily in joint ventures with institutional investor partners. Six residential investments and one commercial investment were sold in 2008 as compared to ten residential investments, two commercial investments, and one land investment sold in 2007.

Non-Operating Items

Interest and other income was $0.6 million in 2008, compared to $0.9 million in 2007. The change was due to lower interest income on bank and escrow deposits, which resulted from a decrease in interest rates.

Interest expense was $8.6 million in 2008 compared to $5.1 million in 2007. The increase was primarily due to the acquisition of several assets, including an office building Japan and apartment project in California in 2008.

Other-than-temporary impairment on available-for-sale security loss was $0.4 million and relates to our recognition of an impairment loss on a stock investment in 2008. There was no impairment loss or income recognized in 2007.

The provision for income taxes was approximately $0.6 million for 2008 compared to $4.4 million in 2007 as a result of the change in income before provision for income taxes.

There were no sales of consolidated real estate in 2008. In 2007, we executed the sale of a commercial project in southern California for $39.4 million. Income from discontinued operations included the gain of $5.3 million from this sale.

Net income attributable to the noncontrolling interests was approximately $54,000 in 2008, a decrease of approximately 98% compared to approximately $2.4 million in 2007. The decrease was related to a non-controlling interest in a commercial project in southern California, which was sold in 2007.

 

34


Table of Contents

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our liquidity and capital resources requirements include expenditures for joint venture investments, real estate held for sale, distressed debt and working capital needs. Historically, we have not required significant capital resources to support our brokerage and property management operations. Generally, we finance our operations with internally generated funds and borrowings under our revolving line of credit. Our investments in real estate are typically financed by mortgage loans secured primarily by that real estate. These mortgage loans are generally nonrecourse in that, in the event of default, recourse will be limited to the mortgaged property serving as collateral. In some cases, we guarantee a portion of the loan related to a joint venture investment, usually until some condition, such as completion of construction or leasing or certain net operating income criteria, has been met. We do not expect these guarantees to materially affect liquidity or capital resources.

Cash Flows Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2008 and 2009

Net cash used in operating activities totaled $25.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, an increase of $10.6 million as compared to the year ended December 31, 2008. The change was primarily due to the cost incurred in connection with the Merger.

Net cash used in operating activities totaled $14.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2008, a decrease of $0.1 million as compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. The change was primarily due to the decrease in net income and accruals for bonuses and income taxes, offset by lower equity in joint venture income and no gain on sale of commercial real estate during the year ended December 31, 2008.

Net cash provided by investing activities totaled approximately $72.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, an increase of $169.3 million as compared to the year ended December 31, 2008. The increase was primarily due to assets acquired in connection with the Merger, decreased contributions to joint ventures, decreased distributions from joint ventures, and proceeds from sales of real estate in 2009.

Net cash used in investing activities totaled about $96.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2008, an increase of $102.2 million as compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. The increase was primarily driven by the use of cash for new investments, which included additional investment in the Japanese joint venture and acquisition of an apartment building, a condominium project, and land in California as well as an office building in Japan during the year ended December 31, 2008.

Net cash used in financing activities totaled approximately $15.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, an increase of $128.3 million as compared to the year ended December 31, 2008. The increase was primarily due to the issuance of stock and the issuance of convertible subordinated debt during the year ended December 31, 2008 as well as increased distributions to noncontrolling interests during the year ended December 31, 2009. Additionally, there were significant mortgage loan repayments from the sale of real estate during the year ended December 31, 2009.

Net cash provided by financing activities totaled about $112.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2008, an increase of $94.7 million as compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. The increase was primarily due to issuance of stock, additional borrowings under lines of credit, and fewer mortgage loan repayments from the sale of real estate during the year ended December 31, 2008. The increase was offset by the payments of dividends to preferred shareholders, which were funded by the combination of cash from operations, borrowings from lines of credit, and proceeds from the sale of investments.

Cash Flows Three Months Ended March 31, 2009 and 2010

Net cash used in operating activities totaled $3.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared to $4.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2009. The change was primarily due to non-cash charges related to stock compensation expense and bonus expense incurred for the three months ended March 31, 2010.

 

35


Table of Contents

Net cash used in investing activities totaled approximately $8.1 million and $1.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. The change was primarily due to contributions in connection with acquiring a loan portfolio in a new joint venture and decreased proceeds from sales of real estate.

Net cash used in financing activities totaled approximately $2.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared to $6.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2009. The change was primarily due to an increase in net repayment of debt in the three months ended March 31, 2009 as compared to the three months ended March 31, 2010. In addition, during the three months ended March 31, 2009, we repurchased shares of our common stock and paid dividends. These changes were offset by distributions to noncontrolling interests during the three months ended March 31, 2010.

To the extent that we engage in additional strategic investments, including real estate, loan portfolios, or acquisitions of other property management companies, we may need to obtain third-party financing which could include bank financing or the public sale or private placement of debt or equity securities. We believe that existing cash and cash equivalents plus capital generated from property management and leasing, brokerage, sales of real estate owned, collections from notes receivable, our current lines of credit and the proceeds from our recent preferred stock offering will provide us with sufficient capital requirements for the next year and the foreseeable future.

Under our current joint venture strategy, we generally contribute property, expertise, and typically a fully funded initial cash contribution (without commitment to additional funding by us). Capital required for additional improvements and supporting operations during lease-up and stabilization periods is generally obtained at the time of acquisition via debt financing or third party investors. Accordingly, we generally do not have significant capital commitments with unconsolidated entities. Infrequently, there may be some circumstances when we, usually with the other members of the joint venture entity, may be required to contribute additional capital for a limited period of time. We believe that we have the capital resources, generated from our business activities and borrowing capacity, to finance any such capital requirements, and do not believe that any additional capital contributions to joint ventures will materially affect liquidity.

Our need, if any, to raise additional funds to meet our capital requirements will depend on many factors, including the success and pace of the implementation of our strategy for growth. We regularly monitor capital raising alternatives to be able to take advantage of other available avenues to support our working capital and investment needs, including strategic partnerships and other alliances, bank borrowings, and the sale of equity or debt securities. We believe we will be able to meet the repayment obligations of notes payable and borrowings under lines of credit from cash generated by our business activities, including the sale of assets and the refinancing of debt. We intend to retain earnings to finance our growth and, therefore, do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock.

 

36


Table of Contents

Contractual Obligations and Commercial Commitments

At December 31, 2009, our contractual cash obligations, including debt, lines of credit, and operating leases included the following:

 

     Payments due by period
     Total    Less than
1 year
   1 - 3 years    4 - 5 years    After 5 years

Contractual obligations

              

Borrowings: (1)

              

Notes payable

   $ 26,133,000    $ 5,600,000    $ 11,200,000    $ 9,333,000    $ —  

Borrowings under lines of credit

     10,000,000      —        10,000,000      —        —  

Mortgage loans payable

     23,968,000      21,190,000      2,778,000      —        —  

Mandatorily convertible debt

     30,000,000      —        —        —        30,000,000

Subordinated debt

     40,000,000      —        —        —        40,000,000
                                  

Total borrowings

     130,101,000      26,790,000      23,978,000      9,333,000      70,000,000
                                  

Operating leases

     8,895,000      1,765,000      2,665,000      2,165,000      2,300,000
                                  

Total contractual cash obligations

   $ 138,996,000    $ 28,555,000    $ 26,643,000    $ 11,498,000    $ 72,300,000

 

(1) See Notes 9-13 of our Note to Consolidated Financial Statements. Figures do not include scheduled interest payments. Assuming each debt obligation is held until maturity, we estimate that we will make the following interest payments: Less than 1 year-$9,230,000; 1-3 years-$12,961,000; 4-5 years-$11,774,000; After 5 years: $54,803,000. The interest payments on variable rate debt have been calculated at the interest rate in effect at December 31, 2009.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have provided guarantees associated with loans secured by assets held in various joint venture partnerships. The maximum potential amount of future payments (undiscounted) we could be required to make under the guarantees was approximately $35 million and $46 million at December 31, 2009 and December 31, 2008, respectively. The guarantees expire by the year end of 2011 and our performance under the guarantees would be required to the extent there is a shortfall in liquidation between the principal amount of the loan and the net sales proceeds of the property. If we were to become obligated to perform on these guarantees, it could have an adverse affect on our financial condition.

Impact of Inflation and Changing Prices

Inflation has not had a significant impact on the results of operations of our Company in recent years and is not anticipated to have a significant impact in the foreseeable future. Our exposure to market risk from changing prices consists primarily of fluctuations in rental rates of commercial and residential properties, market interest rates on residential mortgages and debt obligations and real estate property values. The revenues associated with the commercial services businesses are impacted by fluctuations in interest rates, lease rates, real property values and the availability of space and competition in the market place. Commercial service revenues are derived from a broad range of services that are primarily transaction driven and are therefore volatile in nature and highly competitive. The revenues of the property management operations with respect to rental properties are highly dependent upon the aggregate rents of the properties managed, which are affected by rental rates and building occupancy rates. Rental rate increases are dependent upon market conditions and the competitive environments in the respective locations of the properties. Employee compensation is the principal cost element of property management. Economic trends in 2009 were characterized by general decrease in commercial leasing volume in the U.S.

Qualitative and Quantitative Disclosures about Market Risk

The primary market risk exposure of our company relates to changes in interest rates in connection with our short-term borrowings, some of which bear interest at variable rates based on the lender’s base

 

37


Table of Contents

rate, prime rate, and LIBOR plus an applicable borrowing margin. These borrowings do not give rise to a significant interest rate risk because they have short maturities. However, the amount of income or loss we recognize for unconsolidated joint ventures may be impacted by changes in interest rates. Historically, the impact to the changes in rates have not been significant our company.

Interest Rate Risk

We have established an interest rate management policy, which attempts to minimize our overall cost of debt, while taking into consideration the earnings implications associated with the volatility of short-term interest rates. As part of this policy, we have elected to maintain a combination of variable and fixed rate debt.

The tables below represent contractual balances of our financial instruments at the expected maturity dates as well as the fair value at March 31, 2010. The expected maturity categories take into consideration actual amortization of principal and do not take into consideration reinvestment of cash. The weighted average interest rate for the various assets and liabilities presented are calculated as of March 31, 2010. We closely monitor the fluctuation in interest rates, and if rates were to increase significantly, we believe that we would be able to either hedge the change in the interest rate or to refinance the loans with fixed interest rate debt. All instruments included in this analysis are non-trading.

 

     Principal maturing in:            

(in thousands)

   2010     2011     2012     2013    2014     Thereafter     Total     Fair Value
March 31
2010

Interest rate sensitive assets

                 

Cash equivalents

   $ 43,729        —          —        —        —          —        $ 43,729      $ 43,729

Average interest rate

     0.51 %     —          —        —        —          —          0.51 %     —  

Variable rate receivables

     —          —          —             —          —          —          —  

Average interest rate

     —          —          —             —          —          —          —  

Fixed rate receivables

     6,442        —          —        —        —          —          6,442        6,442

Average interest rate

     13.48 %     —          —        —        —          —          13.48 %     —  
                                 

Total

   $ 50,171        —          —        —        —          —        $ 50,171      $ 50,171
                                 

Weighted average interest rate

     2.17 %     —          —        —        —          —          2.17 %  
                             

Interest rate sensitive liabilities

                 

Variable rate borrowings

   $ 450      $ 14,000        —        —      $ 24,733        —        $ 39,183      $ 39,183

Average interest rate

     4.00 %     3.55 %     —        —        4.00 %     —          3.84 %  

Fixed rate borrowings

     17,497        —        $ 2,859      —        —        $ 70,000 *     90,356        90,356

Average interest rate

     6.16 %     —          2.18 %   —        —          8.18 %     7.60 %  
                                                         

Total

   $ 17,947      $ 14,000      $ 2,859      —      $ 24,733      $ 70,000      $ 129,539      $ 129,539
                                                         

Weighted average interest rate

     6.11 %     3.55 %     2.18 %   —        4.00 %     8.18 %     6.46 %  
                                                     

 

* Does not include the unamortized balance of the beneficial conversion of the convertible subordinated debt of $2,456,000 as of March 31, 2010.

 

38


Table of Contents

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In January 2010, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Update No. 2010-06, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures: Improving Disclosures about Fair Value Measurements, to improve disclosure requirements related to Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures – Subtopic 820. Update No. 2010-06 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods ending after December 15, 2009, except for the disclosures about purchases, sales, issuance, and settlements in the roll forward activity in Level 3 fair value measurements which are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2010. Update No. 2010-06 was adopted on January 1, 2010, and there is no material impact to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. Additionally, we have elected to defer disclosures about purchases, sales, issuance, and settlements in the roll forward activity in Level 3 fair value measurements until the required implementation date noted above.

In December 2009, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Update No. 2009-17, Improvements to Financial Reporting by Enterprises Involved with Variable Interest Entities, to improve the accounting for Variable Interest Entities. Update No. 2009-17 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods ending after December 15, 2009. Update No. 2009-17 was adopted on January 1, 2010, and there is no material impact to the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

On December 15, 2009, McGladrey & Pullen, LLP (“M&P”) was dismissed as the independent registered public accounting firm of the Company by the board of directors.

The report issued by M&P on the financial statements of the Company for the period from inception in July 2007 through December 31, 2007, did not contain an adverse opinion or a disclaimer of opinion, nor was it qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope or accounting principle. The report issued by M&P on the financial statements of the Company for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2008, did not contain an adverse opinion or a disclaimer of opinion, nor was it qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope or accounting principle, except that such report was modified by the inclusion of an explanatory paragraph indicating that there was substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern as a result of the Company’s mandatory liquidation on November 14, 2009 in the event a business combination was not consummated.

The decision to change accountants was approved by the Audit Committee of the Company.

From the Company’s inception in July 2007 through the date of dismissal, there were no disagreements between the Company and M&P on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or auditing scope or procedure, which disagreement(s), if not resolved to the satisfaction of M&P would have caused them to make reference thereto in their reports on the financial statements for such period.

There were no “reportable events” as that term is used in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K occurring during the period beginning on the Company’s inception in July 2007 and ending on September 30, 2009.

On December 15, 2009, the Company retained KPMG LLP (“KPMG”), as its new independent registered public accounting firm. The Company engaged KPMG to audit the Company’s financial statements for the year ending December 31, 2009. From inception in July 2007 through the date of engagement, neither the Company nor anyone on the Company’s behalf has consulted with KPMG regarding (i) the application of accounting principles to a specific transaction, either completed or proposed, or the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on the Company’s financial statements, or

 

39


Table of Contents

(ii) any matter that was either the subject of a disagreement as that term is used in Item 304 (a)(1)(iv) of Regulation S-K and the related instructions to Item 304 of Regulation S-K or a reportable event as that term is used in Item 304(a)(1)(v).

The Company provided M&P with a copy of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on December 18, 2009, which disclosed the above information regarding the dismissal of M&P. The Company requested that M&P furnish it with a letter addressed to the SEC stating whether or not it agreed with the statements in the Current Report. M&P furnished the Company with a letter dated December 15, 2009 addressed to the SEC stating that it agreed with the Company’s statements in Item 4.01 of the Current Report.

 

40


Table of Contents

BUSINESS

Company Overview

Founded in 1977, we are a diversified, international real estate company that provides investment and real estate services. We have grown from an auction business in one office into a vertically-integrated operating company with over 300 professionals in 22 offices throughout the U.S. and Japan. We are an industry leader, currently owning real estate (through our closed-end funds, joint ventures and wholly and majority owned entities) and managing over 40 million square feet of residential, multifamily and commercial real estate, including 10,000 apartment units, throughout the U.S. and Japan. Our operations are defined by two core business units: KW Investments and KW Services. We do not intend to elect and qualify to be taxed as a real estate investment trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

Recent Events

On May 21, 2010 and June 8, 2010, we sold and issued an aggregate of 100,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock for a total purchase price of $100,000,000.

Also in May 2010, we, in a partnership with PCCP, acquired a large apartment complex in Northern California and assumed the existing financing.

In May 2010, we purchased a discounted non-performing note secured by a parcel of land in Hawaii. The unpaid balance on the note was $5.85 million at the time of acquisition. The note was subsequently foreclosed on.

Also in April 2010, we acquired a $41 million loan portfolio from a large regional bank. The acquisition included seller financing and a profit sharing agreement between us and the selling bank.

In April 2010, the board of directors approved the repurchase of up to 7.5 million warrants, and we repurchased 2,090,000 warrants for a total amount of $2.7 million.

In June 2009, a joint venture of which Kennedy-Wilson Residential Condominium Group has a 50.5% ownership interest, acquired 149 unsold units in The Mercury, a Los Angeles condominium property. As of February 28, 2010, the joint venture sold and closed escrow on all 149 units generating a net gain on sale after expenses of approximately $18.7 million.

During 2009, a joint venture in which our Japanese Multi-family Group has a 35% interest, extinguished a total of $131 million of debt in two discounted settlements, resulting in equity in joint venture income to us of $9.9 million.

In October 2009, we entered into an agreement in principle with Deutsche Bank to form a partnership with a total non-binding commitment of up to $500 million (up to approximately $450 million from Deutsche Bank and up to approximately $50 million from us), to finance and acquire distressed real estate debt and to source and finance commercial and multifamily whole loan origination opportunities on the west coast. The partnership made its first investment in February 2010 with the acquisition of a loan portfolio totaling approximately $342 million in unpaid principal balance. The loan portfolio, which was acquired from a large regional bank, is comprised of loans secured by residential, hotel, retail, office, land, multifamily, and other assets predominantly located in Sothern California.

In November 2009, we entered into a separate account agreement with Siguler Guff, a multi-strategy private equity firm. The separate account’s total equity commitment is up to approximately $108 million (including up to approximately $8.1 million from us) and was formed to pursue acquisition and repositioning opportunities of distressed assets with a focus on residential condominium projects. The first acquisition in the platform was completed in December 2009 through a joint venture purchase of a loan secured by a 32 unit condominium project and adjacent developable land in Costa Mesa, CA with an unpaid principal balance of approximately $19.5 million.

 

41


Table of Contents

KW Investments

We formalized our investing activities in 1999 by creating an investment arm, KW Investments. Through this investment arm, we co-invest through separate accounts and closed-end funds in the acquisition of real estate including office, multi-family, loans, retail, hotels, residential condominiums and land for development. We aim to create value with our hands-on approach and seek to harvest value through an exit strategy which is established at the time of acquisition. KW Investments consists of more than 20 investment professionals whose time is dedicated to sourcing, analyzing, executing and managing fund and joint venture investments. In June 2009, we formed KW Capital Markets with the primary function of raising private and institutional capital, assisting with investor relations, and managing other strategic initiatives.

We are a strategic investor and a manager of portfolio investments both in wholly-owned projects and in partnership with institutional investors in the U.S. and Japan. Since 1999, we have invested over $2.0 billion of equity across office, multifamily, retail, hotels, and residential properties through our joint ventures and closed-end funds.

Our investment activity focuses on the west coast of the United States, Tokyo, Japan, Texas and Hawaii. In our investing activity, we typically act as the general partner whereby we invest on average between 5-15% of the equity in a given venture. The target investment size generally ranges from $15-$100 million. In our various investment vehicles, there are typically restrictions on making an investment in a single asset that represents more than 20% of the equity in a given platform without the consent of its limited partner(s).

In general, we invest in value-added properties for which we act as general partner and operator of the property. As general partner and operator of real estate properties, we are responsible for the following:

 

   

acquisitions, including sourcing deals, due diligence and escrow closing;

 

   

leasing, including setting rental rates and negotiating and executing leases;

 

   

renovation, including supervising tenant improvements and/or unit upgrades, construction management and capital improvements to common areas;

 

   

business plan implementation, including refinancing of properties and execution of marketing plans; and

 

   

disposition of properties, including sales timing decisions, brokerage services and escrow closing.

Our investments are generally held in fee simple interest. On average, we utilize approximately 65% loan-to-cost on the properties that we acquire while generally obtaining financing for periods of between 3 and 10 years. Our loans are split between interest only and amortizing in nature. Our properties are generally fully-developed and typically have a renovation plan that include some common area and tenant area work which generally represents less than 10% of the purchase price of the asset.

We have historically raised equity for our investments in three ways: through joint-ventures, closed-end funds and investment specific.

 

42


Table of Contents
   

Our co-investments in joint ventures have typically been between 5% and 15% of the total equity investment. Joint venture and fund investments include the following real estate types:

 

  (i) U.S. Office—Since 1999, we have invested approximately $550 million of equity in the acquisition of 33 office properties in the U.S., totaling more than 6.6 million square feet.

 

  (ii) U.S. Multifamily—Since 1999, we have invested approximately $525 million of equity in the acquisition of 56 multifamily properties in the U.S., totaling approximately 14,600 units and 11.8 million square feet.

 

  (iii) Japan—Our investment professionals have been active in Japan for over a decade and we currently have a strong team of origination, finance and asset management professionals on the ground. Our Japanese activities started in 1995 where we invested approximately $590 million of equity through a former wholly-owned subsidiary that was taken public in February 2002 and has been listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange since 2003. Our Company and our management team owned a majority position in said subsidiary through September 2002 and we were the largest stockholders through May 2003. That company, now the publicly- traded Kenedix, is no longer owned by or affiliated with us. We sold all of our interest in Kenedix at a substantial gain. In 2005, we re-entered the Japanese market when we formed KW Investment Co., Ltd. to acquire multifamily properties in several key markets in Japan with Wachovia Development Corporation as our partner. Since 2005, KW Investment Co. has invested more than $230 million of equity in the acquisition of 2,410 multifamily units, totaling approximately one million square feet. Including our prior investment experience through what is now Kenedix, we have invested a total of approximately $1.7 billion in the acquisition of 81 investments, primarily in multifamily and office properties.

 

  (iv) U.S. Other Real Estate—Since 1999, we have invested approximately $300 million of equity in the acquisition of loans, retail, industrial, residential and other real estate-related investments in the U.S.

 

   

In addition to our joint ventures, we manage several closed-end funds. Below are the descriptions of our closed-end funds that have completed their fund raising:

 

  (i) KWI Property Fund I, L.P. closed with $62.5 million of capital commitments in August 2000. This fund has reached the end of its investment period and is now focused on harvesting the value created from the successful execution of each investment’s business plan.

 

  (ii) KWI Property Fund II, L.P. closed with $106 million of capital commitments in October 2005. This fund is currently fully invested and is now focused on harvesting the value created from the successful execution of each investment’s business plan.

 

  (iii) We manage two Double Bottom-Line funds that seek to provide market rate returns for investors and positive social, economic and environmental benefits to the communities in which they invest. The Double Bottom-Line Funds are typically geographically focused on a specific target market.

 

43


Table of Contents

The following table sets forth certain general information with respect to two of our materially important property investments: Woodstone Apartment Homes, an apartment complex located in Lompoc, California, and The Cove and The Shores, a condominium complex located in Richmond, California:

 

Property

  

Woodstone Apartment Homes

  

The Cove and The Shores

Location    Lompoc, CA    Richmond, CA
Type    Multifamily    Finished Condos/Multifamily
Units    204    484

Square Feet

   146,580    396,978

Acquisition Date

   March 2005    June 2008

Business Plan

   Value-add    Operate unsold condominiums as apartments until market improves to allow for profitable sales

Ownership

   Fee Simple    Fee Simple

Ownership Percentage

   95.6%    19.78%

Loan Balance

   $17,496,982    $65,249,799

Loan Type

   Interest only    Interest only

Floating Interest Rate

   1-month LIBOR plus 1.25%    1-month LIBOR plus 1.45%; Swaps peg LIBOR at 3.33% on $9,300,000 and 2.98% on $9,300,000 to 6/27/2011. Swaps peg LIBOR at 3.34% on $20,700,000 and 2.98% on $20,700,000 to 6/27/2011.

 

Property

  

Woodstone Apartment Homes

  

The Cove and The Shores

Maturity Date

   January 2011    June 2011

Extensions

   1-yr extension    2 1-yr extensions

Loan Balance Due at Maturity

   $17,496,982    $65,249,799

Loan Collateral

   Property    Property

Prepayment Provision

   Open    Release prices of 135% of loan basis per unit

Principal Terms of Sale

   N/A    N/A

Renovation / Improvement Plan

   Complete    None.
Competitive Conditions    Occupancy exceeds market competitors. Limited supply coming online. Rents have been adjusted to retain tenants to address economic conditions.    Occupancy has increased from 75% at closing to a high of 97%. Occupancy continues to exceed budget of 95%.

Notes: RSF stands for rentable square feet.

 

44


Table of Contents

The following table sets forth certain information with respect to the tenancy, leases and occupancies of Woodstone Apartment Homes and The Cove and The Shores:

 

Property

   Woodstone
Apartment
Homes
  The Cove and
The  Shores

Square Feet

   146,580   396,978

Occupancy— January—April 2010

   92.28%   96.02%

Occupancy—2009

   96.08 %   95.70 %

Occupancy—2008

   88.26 %   96.00 %

Occupancy—2007

   97.55 %   N/A

Occupancy—2006

   94.12 %   N/A

Occupancy—2005

   91.20 %   N/A

Major Tenants (=>10% of RSF)

   None   None

Major Tenant Business / Occupation

   None   None

Average Monthly Rent—January—April 2010

   $904 /Unit   $1,286 /Unit

Average Monthly Rent—2009

   $897 /Unit   $1,304 /Unit

Average Monthly Rent—2008

   $929 /Unit   $1,316/Unit

Average Monthly Rent—2007

   $927 /Unit   N/A

Average Monthly Rent—2006

   $893 /Unit   N/A

Average Monthly Rent—2005

   $834 /Unit   N/A

Lease Expirations in 2010

   135   426

Lease Expirations in 2011

   46   42

Annual Rent for Expiring Leases—2010

   $1,470,672   $6,574,478

Annual Rent for Expiring Leases—2011

   $507,108   $627,672

RSF covered by Expiring Leases—2010

   98,524   343,012

RSF covered by Expiring Leases—2011

   31,977   35,358

Percentage of Gross Annual Rent for Expiring Leases—2010

   74.4 %   91.3 %

Percentage of Gross Annual Rent for Expiring Leases—2011

   25.6 %   8.7 %

Note: RSF stands for rentable square feet.

 

45


Table of Contents

KW Services

Through our services group, KW Services, we offer a comprehensive line of real estate services for the full life-cycle of real estate ownership and investment. KW Services provides property management, auction marketing, brokerage, construction and trust management services to financial institutions, other institutional clients and individual investors. Through our extensive network of property managers and brokers, KW Services provides access to real-time market knowledge and trends, along with proprietary deal flow to KW Investments.

 

   

Property & Asset Management—We currently manage 40 million square feet of office, industrial, and retail properties for over 50 institutional clients and individual investors both in the U.S. and Japan.

 

   

Auction Services—Since inception in 1977, we have sold more than $5.0 billion of third-party real estate through the auction process. We are considered one of the leaders in auction marketing, having sold various property types on a global basis. The Auction Services group conducts live and online auctions and executes accelerated marketing programs for all types of residential and commercial real estate.

 

   

Commercial Brokerage—The Commercial Brokerage group is comprised of Investment Sales and Leasing groups. The Investment Sales group specializes in innovative marketing programs tailored to client objectives for all types of real estate and various financial instruments collateralized by real estate. Our real estate professionals in the U.S. and Japan have extensive expertise in marketing, property and loan valuation, asset management, equity and debt sourcing, joint venture formation and financing and real estate acquisition advisory services. The Leasing group is a leader in both landlord and tenant representation. The group provides clients with a full complement of brokerage services for office, industrial, land, multifamily, retail and capital markets disciplines.

 

   

Construction Management—The Construction Management group provides construction and project management services to institutional, corporate and individual clients in all areas of commercial and residential real estate. This group provides a full array of services including site and feasibility analysis, land planning and project design, selection of consultants, financing, bidding and construction administration.

 

   

Trust Management—The Trust Management group provides asset and property management services to some of the largest global banks and trust companies holding investment real estate in the U.S., as trustees on behalf of private and institutional fiduciary accounts.

Our Strengths

We believe we have a unique platform from which to execute our investment and services strategy due to the fact we have both an auction business and an investment platform. We believe that our platform provides significant competitive advantages over other real estate buyers operating stand-alone or investment-focused firms and may allow us to generate superior risk-adjusted returns. Our investment strategy focuses on investments that offer significant appreciation potential through intensive property management, leasing, repositioning, redevelopment and the opportunistic use of capital.

Our competitive advantages include:

 

   

Transaction Experience—Our executive committee has more than 125 years of combined real estate experience and has been working and investing together on average for over a decade. Members of the Executive Committee have collectively acquired, developed and managed in excess of $15 billion of real estate investments in the U.S. and Japan through various economic cycles at our Company and throughout prior careers.

 

46


Table of Contents
   

Extensive Relationship and Sourcing Network—We leverage our services business in order to source off-market deals. In addition, the Executive Committee and our acquisition team have transacted business in nearly every major metropolitan market on the west coast of the U.S., as well as in Japan. Their local presence and reputation in these markets has enabled them to cultivate key relationships with major holders of property inventory, in particular financial institutions, throughout the real estate community.

 

   

Structuring Expertise and Speed of Execution—Prior acquisitions completed by us have taken a variety of forms including direct property investments, joint ventures, exchanges involving stock or operating partnership units, participating loans and investments in performing and non-performing mortgages with the objective of long-term ownership. We believe we have developed a reputation of being able to quickly execute, as well as originate and creatively structure acquisitions, dispositions and financing transactions.

 

   

Vertically-Integrated Platform for Operational Enhancement—We are comprised of over 300 professionals in both KW Investments and KW Services, with 22 regional offices throughout the U.S. and Japan. This diversified business model is aimed at ensuring success through real estate cycles. We have a hands-on approach to real estate investing and possess the local expertise in property management, leasing, construction management, development and investment sales, which we believe enables us to invest successfully in its selected submarkets.

 

   

Risk Protection and Investment Discipline—We underwrite our investments based upon a thorough examination of property economics and a critical understanding of market dynamics and risk management strategies. We conduct an in-depth sensitivity analysis on each of our acquisitions. This analysis applies various economic scenarios that include changes to rental rates, absorption periods, operating expenses, interest rates, exit values and holding periods. We use this analysis to develop our disciplined acquisition strategies.

Strategy and Target Markets

Our investment style and philosophy has been consistent over the past decade and seeks to drive the ongoing strategy for future investments. The three core fundamentals include:

 

   

Significant proprietary deal flow from an established network of industry relationships;

 

   

Focus on a systematic research process with a disciplined approach to investing; and

 

   

Superior in-house operating execution.

We continue to focus primarily on equity real estate investments, utilizing leverage where determined appropriate. In addition, we also acquire real estate-related financings, such as first trust deeds. Specifically, the investment strategy of our Company focuses on the following situations:

 

   

Financially distressed/ownership situations;

 

   

Under-managed or under-leased assets; and

 

   

Repositioning opportunities.

 

47


Table of Contents

We intend to pursue acquisition opportunities for our current investment platforms as follows:

 

   

Commercial Platform—Take advantage of office, industrial and retail debt maturities;

 

   

Funds—Value add/opportunistic strategy; dedicated capital for a variety of deal types;

 

   

Condo Platform—Distressed condo deals; reposition and exit;

 

   

Residential Platform—Combination of current return from multi-family projects and capital return from condo projects; and

 

   

First Trust Deed Platform—Fills void in lending market; provides 10% + unlevered current yield and potential to own real estate at very attractive basis in event of foreclosure.

Our initial target submarkets, which include southern California, the San Francisco Bay area, the Puget Sound area (Greater Seattle), Hawaii and the Greater Tokyo area, share certain similar characteristics that we believe can create investment opportunities. Among these commonalities are dense populations, high barriers to entry, scarcity of land and supply constraints.

KW Services plays a critical role in supporting our investment strategy and various platforms. KW Services intends to continue to facilitate the gathering of local market intelligence and market data for evaluating and valuing investments, generate proprietary transaction flow and create value once an investment is made through efficient implementation of asset management or repositioning strategies.

Industry and Market Overview

United States

We believe that the acquisition outlook for 2010 and beyond is one of opportunity. Since capitalization rates have begun to rise and based on our market analysis, well-capitalized investors will potentially be able to purchase properties at significant discounts to historical cost that may provide significant cash-on-cash returns. The recent credit crunch in the financial markets has dried up liquidity. As a result, many financial institutions have been forced to mark-to-market or sell both their performing and non-performing assets in order to firm up their balance sheets. We believe that U.S. financial institutions and publicly traded companies, such as Real Estate Investment Trusts, will continue to be forced sellers of their real estate hard assets and loans for the next several quarters.

Due to the current disarray in the financial markets, many U.S. real estate markets are experiencing a downturn in occupancy and property values. Unlike the last cycle, this downturn has been driven by the lack of liquidity and the tightening of the credit markets rather than by an oversupply of new product. We believe that underlying real estate fundamentals have remained solid, particularly in major metropolitan and downtown areas where supply constraints exist, and companies continue to consolidate in proximity to their corporate headquarters. Also, downward pricing pressures exist that create potential buying opportunities. We will seek to exploit the opportunities caused by the current economic downturn and closed capital markets by identifying the cities and submarkets that have the most predictable, near-term positive indicators.

We believe the recent economic, capital and credit markets events will create tremendous buying opportunities as properties may be purchased at significant discounts to historical cost. Many asset dispositions will result from:

 

   

forced liquidation through bankruptcy proceedings;

 

   

companies reducing real estate portfolios to raise cash to shore up their balance sheets; and

 

48


Table of Contents
   

highly leveraged property owners who will have loans come due in 2010 and 2011 and will be unable to refinance.

As sellers are under greater pressure to move assets off of their balance sheets, our strong sourcing relationships will position us as the buyer of choice to acquire properties at steep discounts. Sellers will look to firms that they have relationships with and can execute quickly and discreetly. We have long-standing relationships with healthy regional and international lenders who have expressed an ability and willingness to offer financing for investments.

Although interest rates remain low, the lack of available debt has constrained highly-leveraged buyers. We believe that the timing of the real estate market cycle combined with our deep market relationships, systematic research process and cross-platform synergies will be crucial to its potential success.

Japan

We predict that Japan, while still subject to the same market forces affecting economies across the globe, will likely experience a downturn that is shorter than that in other industrialized economies as the Japanese banking system remains strong relative to its peers. We believe that the country’s economy is in a better position to weather current economic conditions relative to the economies of certain other countries because over the past decade Japanese households generally have saved money, and companies have steeply reduced their debt as a proportion of GDP. In the current credit environment, as in the U.S., highly-leveraged investors in Japan have been forced to reduce their debt resulting in a rise in capitalization rates.

Japan’s current demographic trends include an influx of migration to major cities creating strong demand for housing. Our research shows that real estate fundamentals have remained strong in Greater Tokyo’s residential market, and, in particular, in Tokyo’s three major wards: Minato-ku, Shibuya-ku, and Setagaya-ku. With diminishing supply of new inventory due to stricter building regulations imposed in 2007, rents for quality assets are expected to remain strong while vacancy rates remains stable. We expect that properties in the Greater Tokyo area that are newer and of higher quality will remain target assets for acquisition by many institutional investors.

Competition

We compete with a range of both local and national real estate firms, individual investors and corporations. Because of our unique combination of businesses, we compete with brokerage and property management companies as well as companies that invest in real estate and distressed notes. The brokerage and property management businesses are both highly fragmented and competitive. We compete with real estate brokerage companies on the basis of our relationship with property owners, quality of service, and commissions charged. We compete with property management and leasing firms also on the basis of our relationship with clients, the range and quality of services provided, and fees and commissions charged. Our investment operations compete to varying degrees with real estate investment partnerships and other investment companies. We compete with these other investors on the basis of our relationship with the sellers and our ability to close an investment transaction in a short time period at competitive pricing.

We differentiate ourselves from other firms in the industry with our full service, investment oriented structure. Whereas most other firms use an investment platform to obtain additional service business revenue, we use our service platform to enhance the investment process and ensure the alignment of interest with our investors.

Since each market and opportunity is unique, different competitors surface in each transaction. Due to our proprietary sourcing capabilities, we often acquire properties in off-market transactions where we face limited competition. In more widely marketed transactions, our significant on-the-ground operations provide insight into market conditions and trends that we believe allows for informed acquisition strategies.

 

49


Table of Contents

In contrast to our vertically-integrated platform and deep market knowledge, many large institutional players act as “asset allocators” and rely on firms similar to us and the third-party brokerage community to source their deals. These competitors tend to focus on large, widely-marketed “Class A” properties that do not require significant on-the-ground expertise, hands-on redevelopment or local market knowledge.

We also compete for investment opportunities with regional investors and developers who understand the local markets but lack the equity to close deals with their own capital.

Due to our reputation for certainty of close, capital availability and discretion in publicizing deals, we are often able to acquire properties even when we are not the highest bidder. Our relationship-driven approach, reputation for certainty of close, local market knowledge and on-the-ground experience strongly position us when compared to our competition.

Markets

We believe that real estate is a local business. With this in mind, we intend to continue to focus on the markets that we know well through both our investment experience and service businesses. We intend to continue to target markets that we have been successful in historically due to our in-depth knowledge and relationships.

Our focused research process begins with a macro analysis (economic growth, overall market cycles, property specific cycles, availability and pricing, ranking/evaluation) and ends with a micro analysis (submarket/neighborhood analysis, site analysis, due diligence and risk/return analysis). We will often leverage KW Services to access real-time market knowledge and trends to determine our investment analysis and strategy process and choices of markets/submarkets. This rigorous process continues to be a key driver of our investment decisions.

The choice of markets and submarkets for our investment strategy will be based on a research-driven process that involves five stages of extensive analysis.

 

   

Stage 1: Growth Composite of Employment/Population/Income Compared to Nation. Each city is analyzed using a composite index of growth that weighs the last six years of growth history with the next five years of forecasted employment, population and income trends as compared to the overall nation. The risk of the growth forecast and the stability of the economic base and political climate are also considered at this stage.

 

   

Stage 2: Evaluation of a City’s Overall Market Cycle Position by Property Type. In the second stage, macro market cycle analysis is conducted by property type. Certain statistical adjustments are then applied to the geographical submarkets within each city to determine if a city, and property type is operating above or below “equilibrium,” and if market upside potential exists within each city and property type.

 

   

Stage 3: Product Specific Cycle Analysis in Each City. This stage requires extensive market research and interviews with local experts at the submarket level. In this stage, each product type is evaluated with respect to its upside potential. Three types of cycles and upside potential are measured at this stage:

 

   

occupancy cycle upside,

 

   

rent rate cycle upside, and

 

   

Property value upside.

 

50


Table of Contents

A key part of this analysis is to determine what discounts from replacement cost and current cash-on-cash returns can be achieved relative to the upside potential for each property type. We seek to buy well-located properties at prices substantially below replacement cost.

 

   

Stage 4: Evaluation of Product Availability and Pricing. The focus in this stage is to determine the total product inventory of each targeted property class in the specified market, evaluate recent transactions in the market and submarkets and project the amount of new product that will likely become available for purchase in the future. Based on recent transactions, market studies and interviews with local market experts in each city (brokers, appraisers and market researchers), the expected economics of properties purchased in the future are estimated, including estimates of capitalization rates, rents, occupancy levels and sales prices relative to replacement cost.

 

   

Stage 5: Ranking/Evaluation Relative to our Investment Strategy. In the final stage of the evaluation process, the overall desirability of each city for investment is evaluated within the context of our investment strategy. The market niches that offer the most upside are identified, and a strategy is developed to capitalize on those niches. During this step, investment allocations are suggested for each city, including the amount of capital to be invested in each city and product type over a defined investment time horizon.

In parallel with our thorough examination of market dynamics, we conduct an in-depth risk management analysis on each of our acquisitions. This analysis applies various economic conditions and scenario forecasts that include changes to rental rates, operating expenses, interest rates, exit values and holding periods. We use this analysis to develop our disciplined pricing strategies.

This market analysis will help to determine the acquisition strategies for a variety of markets and submarkets that have the highest probability for near-term value appreciation and to develop operating and exit strategies that enhance returns and limit risk exposure.

Clients and Customers

We have long and extensive relationships with a broad range of prominent institutions with which we have invested through joint venture and fund arrangements and for which we have provided services. These institutions include sovereign funds, financial institutions, insurance companies, pension funds, endowments, money managers and family offices.

Employees

As of April 30, we had approximately 296 employees. We consider our relationship with our employees to be good and have not experienced any interruptions of our operations as a result of labor disagreements.

Properties

Our corporate headquarters is located in Beverly Hills, California. We also have 21 other offices throughout the U.S., including our disaster recovery office in Austin, Texas, and one office in Japan. The Beverly Hills office operates as the main investment and asset management center for us in the United States, while the Japan office is the main investment and asset management center for the Japanese operations. The remaining office locations primarily operate as property management satellites. In general, we lease all of our offices. In addition, we have on-site property management offices located within properties that we manage. The most significant terms of the leasing arrangements for our offices are the length of the lease and the rent. Our leases have terms varying in duration. The rent payable under our office leases vary significantly from location to location as a result of differences in prevailing commercial real estate rates in different geographic locations. Our management believes that except as provided below, no single office lease is material to our business, results of operations or financial condition. In addition, our management believes there is adequate alternative office space available at acceptable rental rates to meet our needs, although adverse movements in rental rates in some markets may negatively affect our profits in those markets when we enter into new leases.

 

51


Table of Contents

The following table sets forth certain information regarding our corporate headquarters and regional office located in Austin, Texas.

 

Location

   Use    Approximate
Square

Footage
   Lease Expiration
Beverly Hills, CA    Corporate Headquarters    20,000    12/31/2016
Austin, TX    Regional Office; Disaster Recovery Office    6,864    3/31/2012

Legal Proceedings

We may be involved in various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, none of which is material to our business. From time to time, our real estate management division is named in “slip and fall” type litigation relating to buildings we manage. Our standard management agreement contains an indemnity provision whereby the building owner indemnifies and agrees to defend its real estate management division against such claims. In such cases, we are defended by the building owner’s liability insurer.

 

52


Table of Contents

MANAGEMENT

Directors and Executive Officers

Set forth below is the name, age and title of each director and executive officer of the Company followed by a summary of each director’s and executive’s background and principal occupations. Unless otherwise indicated, each director’s and executive officer’s term of office as a director or executive officer of the Company commenced on November 13, 2009.

 

Name

   Age   

Position

William J. McMorrow    63    Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Mary Ricks    45    Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Commercial Investment Group
Freeman A. Lyle    56    Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Robert E. Hart    52    President, KW Multi-Family Management Group
Donald J. Herrema    57    Executive Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Capital Markets
Kent Mouton    56    Director
Jerry R. Solomon    59    Director
Norman Creighton(1)    74    Director
Thomas Sorell    55    Director
David A. Minella(1)    57    Director
Cathy Hendrickson(1)    63    Director

 

(1) Serves on the Audit Committee, Nominations Committee and Compensation Committee

William J. McMorrow—Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. McMorrow joined Kennedy-Wilson in 1988 and has been Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Kennedy-Wilson since 1998. Mr. McMorrow is the architect of Kennedy-Wilson’s expansion into real estate brokerage, property management and investment services. In addition to his real estate experience, Mr. McMorrow has more than 17 years of banking experience. Prior to joining Kennedy-Wilson, he was the Executive Vice President and Chairman of the Credit Policy Committee at Imperial Bancorp and also has held senior positions with a variety of financial services companies, including eight years as a Senior Vice President of Fidelity Bank. He received a B.S. in Business and an M.B.A. from the University of Southern California. Mr. McMorrow is on the Executive Board of the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate and is involved in numerous charities in Southern California, including Chrysalis, the Rape Treatment Center, the Village School and Loyola High School. Mr. McMorrow was selected to serve as a member of our board of directors because of his significant achievements with, and intimate knowledge of, the Company and his extensive experience in banking and real estate.

Mary Ricks—Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Commercial Investment Group. Ms. Ricks joined Kennedy-Wilson in 1990, is Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and has been has been Chief Executive Officer of KW Commercial Investment Group since 2008. Ms. Ricks is responsible for the Company’s acquisitions and dispositions of commercial assets as well as oversight of

 

53


Table of Contents

the Company’s activities in Japan. Prior to joining Kennedy-Wilson, Ms. Ricks was a commercial broker at Hanes Company. She has been named by the L.A. Business Journal as one of the top women in commercial real estate and was featured on the covers of Forum Magazine and Real Estate California recognizing women at the top of the field. She received a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles, where she was an All-American athlete. Ms. Ricks is a founding board member of the Richard S. Ziman Center for Real Estate at UCLA.

Freeman A. Lyle—Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Lyle joined Kennedy-Wilson in 1996 and has been Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Kennedy-Wilson since 1996. Mr. Lyle is responsible for all aspects of finance and administration for the Company, including strategic planning, capital formation, financial reporting, risk management, investor relations and information technology. Prior to joining Kennedy-Wilson, he was Vice President and Controller for R&B Realty Group. Prior to R&B Realty, Mr. Lyle was with Ernst & Young LLP. He received a B.S. in Business from the California State University at Northridge and an M.B.A. from the University of Southern California. He is a Certified Public Accountant.

Robert E. Hart—President, KW Multi-Family Management Group. Mr. Hart has been President of KW Multi-Family Management Group since 2006. He joined Kennedy-Wilson in 2000. Mr. Hart is responsible for the oversight of acquisitions, asset management and dispositions of multifamily assets in the U.S. and Japan. Prior to joining Kennedy-Wilson, Mr. Hart served as a Senior Vice President of Portfolio Management for Heitman Capital Management as well as Director of Real Estate Marketing for Executive Life Insurance Company Enhancement Trusts. He received a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and an M.B.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles’ Anderson School of Management. Mr. Hart is Chair of the board of directors of Chrysalis and an Associate of the Richard S. Ziman Center for Real Estate at UCLA. He is a member of the Real Estate Investment Advisory Council, the Urban Land Institute and the California Lexington Group. He is a former President of the UCLA Anderson School of Management Alumni Association and a former member of both the Board of the UCLA Alumni Association and the Anderson School Board of Visitors.

Donald J. Herrema—Executive Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Capital Markets. Mr. Herrema is Executive Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and Chief Executive Officer of KW Capital Markets. He joined Kennedy-Wilson in 2009. Mr. Herrema is responsible for Kennedy-Wilson’s capital markets and fundraising activities. Prior to joining Kennedy-Wilson, he founded BlackSterling Partners, LLC, served as CEO of Bessemer Trust, Loring Ward, Atlantic Trust (subsidiary of Invesco), and was Head of Private Wealth Management at Morgan Stanley. He began his career at Wells Fargo Bank, where he ultimately served as both President of Wells Fargo Securities and Head of the Mutual Funds Division. Mr. Herrema received a B.A. from Whittier College and an M.A. in Economics from the University of Southern California. Mr. Herrema is a Director of TD Bank Asset Management USA Funds and Lepercq, de Neuflize and Co and also serves as a Senior Advisor to Stone Point Capital.

Kent Mouton—Director. Mr. Mouton served as a director of Kennedy-Wilson since 1995. Mr. Mouton is a partner with the law firm Kulik, Gottesman, Mouton & Siegel LLP, where he specializes in real estate law, primarily in the areas of real estate lending and finance, joint ventures, land use, acquisitions and dispositions, leasing, development and construction, common interest subdivisions (condominiums and planned unit developments) and real estate brokerage. He has been an Adjunct Professor of real estate law at the UCLA Extension since 1979, and teaches various real estate related UCLA Extension courses. Mr. Mouton has been honored by his peers by being designated a Southern California Real Estate “Super Lawyer” in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. Mr. Mouton is a former member of the Board of Governors of the Century City Bar Association and formerly was a Co-Chairperson of the Century City Bar Association Real Estate Law Section. He also serves on the Los Angeles County Bar Real Property Section Real Estate Finance, Land Use Planning and Commercial Development Steering Committees. Mr. Mouton graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1975 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics (Dean’s List, Summa Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa) and received his law degree in 1978 from the University of California, Los Angeles. Mr. Mouton was selected to serve as a member of our board of directors because of his experience and knowledge relating to the legal and financial aspects of real estate investment and his significant experience in public and private company advisory and governance activities.

 

54


Table of Contents

Jerry R. Solomon—Director. Mr. Solomon served as a director of Kennedy-Wilson since 2001. Mr. Solomon received both his B.S. Degree in accounting (1973) and an M.B.A. (1974) from UC Berkeley. Throughout college and following graduation, he worked in the tax department of JK Lasser & Company that later became Touche Ross & Company. After leaving JK Lasser, Mr. Solomon joined a large local CPA firm where he became the partner in charge of the comprehensive business services department as well as the administrative partner in charge of 7 partners and 80 staff. In 1988 he formed Solomon & Company CPA’s Inc. that later merged with Harold G. Winnett and the firm was renamed Solomon, Winnett & Rosenfield Certified Public Accountants, Inc. Mr. Solomon’s practice areas of expertise include both real estate industry and service industries. He consults frequently with high net worth individuals and families in tax and transactional planning. Mr. Solomon currently sits on several board of directors and on the boards of several philanthropic organizations. Mr. Solomon was selected to serve as a member of our board of directors because of his significant experience in the public accounting profession, particularly in the real estate and services industries, and with public and private company advisory and governance activities.

Norman Creighton—Director. Mr. Creighton served as a director of Kennedy-Wilson since 2004. From 1975 to 2001, Mr. Creighton was employed with Imperial Bank, serving as President and Chief Executive Officer from 1983 to 2001. During Mr. Creighton’s tenure with Imperial Bank, its assets increased from approximately $200 million in 1975 to approximately $7 billion in 2001. Prior to Imperial Bank, Mr. Creighton served as Regional Vice President for Southern Arizona of Great Western Bank from 1971 to 1974. From 1958 to 1971, Mr. Creighton was employed with Arizona Bank, including as Manager of the Tuscon Headquarters. Mr. Creighton holds a B.S. in banking and finance from the University of Montana. Mr. Creighton was selected to serve as a member of our board of directors because of his extensive experience and knowledge of business, accounting and the banking industry.

Thomas Sorell—Director. Mr. Sorell served as a director of Kennedy-Wilson since 2008. Mr. Sorell is Executive Vice President and Chief Investment Officer of Guardian Life Insurance Company of America, Guardian Investor Services LLC and other Guardian subsidiaries. Mr. Sorell has over 30 years of financial experience. He is responsible for Guardian’s investment policy and strategies for over $30 billion in assets. This includes investments in both public and private equity, fixed income, and commercial real estate. Mr. Sorell recently served as President of The Park Avenue Portfolio® Family of Mutual Funds and is a Director of RS Investment Co. Mr. Sorell joined Guardian in 1994 from White River Corporation, where he served as Director of Fixed Income. Prior to that, he held investment management positions at Fund American Enterprises, Inc. and AIG Investment Advisors as well as institutional fixed income sales and research positions at Drexel Burnham Lambert & Co., and Kidder, Peabody & Co. Mr. Sorell holds a B.A. from Colgate University and an M.B.A. from New York University. He has a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation, and is a member of the ACLI-CIO Board of Advisors, CFA Institute and the New York Society of Security Analysts. Mr. Sorell was selected to serve as a member of our board of directors because of his extensive experience in the financial services industry, particularly in the fields of public and private equity.

David A. Minella—Director. Mr. Minella served as the Prospect’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer since its inception in July 2007 through November 2009. Mr. Minella has been the managing member of Minella Capital Management LLC, a financial services advisory firm, since December 2006 and the managing member of Flat Ridge Investments LLC, a private investment vehicle, since July 2007. Between 1997 and March 2007, Mr. Minella served as the Chief Executive Officer and a director of Value Asset Management LLC, or VAM, a strategic investment management holding company. At VAM, Mr. Minella was responsible for its overall business strategy, acquisitions and financial results. Under Mr. Minella’s leadership, VAM acquired a controlling interest in five separate investment management firms: Dalton Hartman Greiner and Maher, New York, NY; Harris Bretall Sullivan and Smith, San Francisco, CA; Hillview Capital Advisors, LLC, New York, NY; Grosvenor Capital Management LP, Chicago, IL; and MDT Advisers LLC, Cambridge, MA. All of the original acquisitions have been sold. From 1995 to 1997, Mr. Minella was the President and Chief Executive Officer of the asset management

 

55


Table of Contents

division of Liechtenstein Global Trust, or LGT, a wealth and asset management firm, where he was responsible for the overall business strategy and financial results. During Mr. Minella’s tenure as LGT’s Chief Executive Officer, he also led LGT’s acquisition of Chancellor Capital Management, a large United States equity investment firm. Mr. Minella originally joined the LGT group in 1987 as the head of its United States subsidiaries, GT Capital Management and GT Global. Mr. Minella established its United States mutual fund business through the broker-dealer community, reestablished LGT’s institutional separate account capabilities, and developed the firm’s global equity sector expertise. Currently, Mr. Minella serves as a director of Lindsell Train Japan Fund and Lindsell Train Global Media Fund, both offshore hedge funds managed out of London, UK. In addition, Mr. Minella is a member of the Executive Council at Bunker Hill Capital Management, a private equity firm in Boston, Massachusetts, the former Chairman of the board of directors of MDT Advisers LLC and a former board member of the Investment Company Institute. Mr. Minella holds a B.S. in accounting from Bentley College. Mr. Minella was selected to serve as a member of our board of directors because of his significant financial industry experience, particularly relating to investment strategies and asset management.

Cathy Hendrickson—Director. Ms. Hendrickson served as a director of Kennedy-Wilson since 2004. Ms. Hendrickson has forty one years experience in banking which includes eight years with Union Bank in Los Angeles in Economic Research/Corporate Planning, Leveraged Leasing, Credit, and the National Division, three years at Philadelphia based Fidelity Bank’s Los Angeles Loan Production Office, one year in Crocker Bank’s Southern California Corporate Banking Division, two years as Manager of Imperial Bank’s Headquarters Office located at the Los Angeles International Airport, ten years as Regional Vice President of Metrobank’s South Bay Headquarters Office in Torrance, and two years as President of Palos Verdes National Bank. Since May, 1993, Ms. Hendrickson served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Bay Cities National Bank (formerly Peninsula National Bank). Ms. Hendrickson also serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of Peninsula Banking Group, Inc. and on the boards of Bay Cities National Bank, Peninsula Banking Group, Inc. and Community First Financial Group, Inc. Ms. Hendrickson was selected to serve as a member of our board of directors because of her extensive experience as a high level executive in the banking and financial industries.

Board Composition

We have a classified board of directors which is divided into three classes. Each class of the board of directors is set forth below:

 

   

Cathy Hendrickson and Thomas Sorell in the class to stand for reelection in 2010;

 

   

Jerry Solomon and David A. Minella in the class to stand for reelection in 2011; and

 

   

William J. McMorrow, Kent Mouton and Norman Creighton in the class to stand for reelection in 2012.

At each annual meeting of stockholders, the successors to directors whose terms then expire will serve until the third annual meeting following their election and until their successors are duly elected and qualified. This classification of the board of directors may have the effect of delaying or preventing changes in our control or management.

Director Independence

Directors Prior to the Merger

Prior to our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., which was consummated on November 13, 2009, we were a blank check company formed to serve as a vehicle to effect a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition or other similar business combination with an operating business in the financial services industry. In connection with the merger, our directors and officers were replaced by the officers and directors of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., except for David Minella, our former Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, who continues to serve as one of our directors.

 

56


Table of Contents

Prior to the merger our Common Stock was listed on AMEX, which requires that a majority of a listed company’s board of directors be composed of “independent directors,” which is defined generally as a person other than an officer or employee of the company or its subsidiaries or any other individual having a relationship, which, in the opinion of the company’s board of directors would interfere with the director’s exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director.

Prior to the merger, our former board of directors determined that each of Michael P. Castine, William Cvengros, Michael Downey, Daniel Gressel and John Merchant, who served as directors prior to the merger, were independent as such term is defined under the rules of AMEX and Rule 10A-3 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act.

Current Directors

Effective March 19, 2010, our Common Stock became listed on the NYSE. A majority of the members of our board of directors must be independent under Section 303A.01 of the listing standards of the NYSE. Section 303A.02 of the NYSE listing standards provide that no director can qualify as independent unless the board of directors affirmatively determines that the director has no material relationship with the listed company. Our board of directors has adopted the following standards in determining whether or not a director has a material relationship with the Company and these standards are contained in our Corporate Governance Guidelines and can be found our website at www.kennedywilson.com and can be made available in print free of charge to any stockholder who requests it.

 

   

No director who is an employee or a former employee of the Company can be independent until three years after termination of such employment.

 

   

No director who is, or in the past three years has been, affiliated with or employed by the Company’s present or former independent auditor can be independent until three years after the end of the affiliation, employment or auditing relationship.

 

   

No director can be independent if he or she is, or in the past three years has been, part of an interlocking directorship in which an executive officer of the Company serves on the compensation committee of another company that employs the director.

 

   

No director can be independent if he or she is receiving, or in the last three years has received, more than $120,000 during any 12-month period in direct compensation from the Company, other than director and committee fees and pension or other forms of deferred compensation for prior service (provided such compensation is not contingent in any way on continued service).

 

   

Directors with immediate family members in the foregoing categories are subject to the same three-year restriction.

 

   

No director can be independent if he or she is a current employee, or an immediate family member is a current executive officer, of a company that has made payments to, or received payments from, the Company for property or services in an amount which, in any of the last three fiscal years, exceeds the greater of $1 million, or 2% of such other company’s consolidated gross revenues.

Based on these independence standards and all of the relevant facts and circumstances, our board of directors determined that none of the following directors had any material relationship with the Company and, thus, are independent under Section 303A.02 of the listing standards of NYSE: Norman Creighton, Cathy Hendrickson, Thomas Sorell and David Minella. In accordance with NYSE rules a majority of our board of directors is independent.

 

57


Table of Contents

Board Committees

Our board of directors has a Compensation Committee, a Nominating Committee and an Audit Committee.

Compensation Committee

The members of the Compensation Committee are Norman Creighton (chairman), Cathy Hendrickson and David Minella. Each of the current members of the Compensation Committee are considered “independent” under Section 303A.02 of the listing standards of the NYSE, as determined by our board of directors. The Compensation Committee operates under a written charter. The Compensation Committee charter can be found on our website at www.kennedywilson.com and can be made available in print free of charge to any stockholder who requests it.

The Compensation Committee has overall responsibility for evaluating and approving the Company’s compensation plans, policies and programs. The Compensation Committee evaluates the performance of the Chief Executive Officer and other executive officers and, based on such evaluation, reviews and approves the compensation of the Chief Executive Officer and other executive officers. The Compensation Committee may consult with the Chief Executive Officer regarding the amount or form of the compensation for the other executive officers. The Compensation Committee may also form and delegate responsibilities to subcommittees. The Compensation Committee also reviews and recommends to the full board of directors compensation of directors. The Compensation Committee administers our 2009 Equity Participation Plan.

Nominating Committee

The purpose of the Nominating Committee is to, among other things, discharge the responsibilities of our board of directors relating to the appropriate size, functioning and needs of our board of directors, including, but not limited to, recruitment and retention of high quality board members and the composition and structure of committees of the board of directors.

The members of the Nominating Committee are Cathy Hendrickson (chairman), Norman Creighton and David Minella. Each of the above-listed Nominating Committee members is considered “independent” under Section 303A.02 of the listing standards of the NYSE, as determined by our board of directors.

The Nominating Committee operates under a written charter. The Nominating Committee charter can be found on our website at www.kennedywilson.com and can be made available in print free of charge to any stockholder who requests it.

The Nominating Committee will consider director candidates recommended by security holders based upon the policies set forth in the Nominating Committee charter. Stockholders who wish to recommend to the Nominating Committee a candidate for election should send a letter to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc., 9701 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 700, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, ATTN: Nominating Committee. The letter must set forth certain biographical information regarding the nominees as specified in the Nominating Committee charter. Recommendations by security holders must be received no later than thirty (30) days after the end of the Company’s fiscal year.

Candidates will be reviewed in the context of the current composition of the board of directors, the operating requirements of the Company and the long-term interests of the Company’s stockholders. Although there are no specific minimum qualifications or any specific qualities or skills that the Nominating Committee believes that the potential nominees must have, the Nominating Committee

 

58


Table of Contents

considers and evaluates each candidate upon an assessment of certain criteria as set forth in the Nominating Committee charter. Although diversity may be a consideration in the nomination process, the Nominating Committee does not have a formal policy with regard to the consideration of diversity in identifying director nominees.

The Nominating Committee does not have a formal procedure for identifying or evaluating director nominees except as set forth in the Nominating Committee charter. A potential director nominee recommended by a security holder will not be evaluated any differently than any other potential nominee. Although it has not done so in the past, the Nominating Committee may retain search firms to assist in identifying suitable director candidates.

Audit Committee

The Audit Committee operates under a written charter. The Audit Committee charter can be found on our website at www.kennedywilson.com and can be made available in print free of charge to any stockholder who requests it.

The Audit Committee charter states that the responsibilities of the Audit Committee shall include, among other things, to assist the board of directors in monitoring (i) the integrity of the annual, quarterly and other financial statements of the Company, (ii) the independent auditor’s qualifications and independence, (iii) the performance of the Company’s internal audit function and independent auditor and (iv) the compliance by the Company with legal and regulatory requirements. The Audit Committee also reviews and approves all related-party transactions and prepares the report required by the rules of the SEC, to be included in the Company’s annual proxy statement.

Pursuant to its charter, the Audit Committee meets at least quarterly. The Company does not limit the number of audit committees of other companies on which its Audit Committee members can serve.

The members of the Nominating Committee are Cathy Hendrickson, Norman Creighton (chairman) and David Minella. Each of the above-listed Nominating Committee members is considered “independent” under Section 303A.02 of the listing standards of the NYSE, as determined by our board of directors.

Our board of directors has determined that we have at least one audit committee financial expert, as defined in the Exchange Act, serving on our Audit Committee. Norman Creighton is the “audit committee financial expert” and is an independent member of our board of directors.

Code of Ethics

Our board of directors has adopted a code of ethics that applies to our directors, officers and employees. A copy of the code of ethics is available on our website at www.kennedywilson.com.

 

59


Table of Contents

Director Compensation

Each non-employee director, other than Thomas Sorell, received a fee of $25,000 per year, $1,000 for each board of directors meeting attended and $500 for each committee meeting attended. The following table provides compensation information for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009 for each non-employee member of our board of directors:

 

Name(2)

   Fees
Earned
or Paid
in Cash
   Stock
Awards  (1)
   Option
Awards  (1)
   Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation
   All Other
Compensation
   Total

Kent Mouton

   $ 32,000    $ —      $ 72,450    $ —      $ 10,000    $ 114,450

Cathy Hendrickson

   $ 31,000    $ —      $ 72,450    $ —      $ 10,000    $ 113,450

Jerry Solomon

   $ 29,000    $ —      $ 72,450    $ —      $ 10,000    $ 111,450

Thomas Sorrell

   $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —  

David Minella(3)

   $ 7,750    $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ 7,750

Norman Creighton

   $ 33,000    $ —      $ 72,450    $ —      $ 10,000    $ 115,450

Jeffrey Hudson(4)

   $ 16,500    $ —      $ 72,450    $ —      $ 10,000    $ 98,950

 

(1) This column shows the full grant date fair value of restricted stock awards and stock options under FASB ASC Topic 718. Information regarding the valuation assumptions used in the calculations are included in Note 17 to the Company’s financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009 contained elsewhere in this prospectus. The options consist of options to purchase shares of common stock of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., which was merged with a subsidiary of the Company on November 13, 2009. In connection with the merger, all outstanding options were cancelled. See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis”.
(2) Mr. McMorrow receives no compensation for his service as a director.
(3) Mr. Minella became a non-employee director on November 13, 2009 upon consummation of the merger.
(4) Mr. Hudson resigned as a director of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. on November 13, 2009 in connection with the merger.

 

60


Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The following discussion sets forth certain information regarding our executive compensation. Unless specifically noted or the context provides otherwise, as used throughout this section, “we,” “our,” “us” or the “Company” and the disclosures relating to executive compensation refer to Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and its subsidiaries prior to, and Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries subsequent to, the closing of the merger between the Company and Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., which was consummated on November 13, 2009. “Prospect” refers to the Company prior to the merger.

Executive Compensation of Prospect Acquisition Corp. prior to the Merger

None of Prospect’s executive officers received any cash or other compensation for services rendered to the Company in any capacity. However, Prospect’s executive officers and their affiliates were reimbursed for certain out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with activities on Prospect’s behalf such as identifying potential target businesses and performing due diligence.

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

I. NEOs

As required by SEC rules, the following compensation discussion explains compensation decisions with respect to those executive officers who constitute our “Named Executive Officers” (“NEOs”) under SEC rules. These rules provide that the NEOs are the principal executive officer, the principal financial officer, and the three most highly compensated executive officers other than the principal executive officer and the principal financial officer. For 2009 our NEOs were the following (titles are those at year end):

 

•  William J. McMorrow    Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
•  Freeman A. Lyle    Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
•  Mary Ricks    Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Commercial Investment Group
•  Donald J. Herrema    Executive Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Capital Markets. Mr. Herrema joined the Company as an employee in June 2009. Previously, beginning in January 2009 he provided consulting services to the Company.
•  Robert E. Hart    President, KW Multi-Family Management Group

II. Executive Compensation Philosophy and Objectives

Our core compensation philosophy has been to pay our executive officers a competitive level of compensation that best reflects individual performance, overall responsibility to us, and our performance and the performance of our business units.

This philosophy was implemented for the NEOs through a combination of base salary, the opportunity to earn significant bonuses, long-term incentives and executive benefits. Prior to the merger, our Chief Executive Officer generally determined the bonuses to be paid to the other NEOs and our Compensation Committee determined the bonuses to be paid to the Chief Executive Officer. Following the consummation of the merger, our Compensation Committee determines the compensation of all of the NEOs with the consultation of the Chief Executive Officer.

 

61


Table of Contents

III. Elements of Compensation

For the years prior to 2009, we generally utilized three components of compensation: base salary, annual bonuses and benefits. As will be discussed below, long-term incentives became a significant element of executive compensation for our NEOs in 2009. Due to our overall philosophy of maintaining a pay mix that results fundamentally in a pay-for-performance orientation for executives, in years prior to 2008 the most significant element of compensation for the NEOs was bonuses. As reflected in the summary compensation table, bonuses for 2008 were much less than salary for 2008, reflecting the fact that the decline in our financial performance in 2008, as compared to prior years, made it appropriate to award much lower bonuses or no bonuses to the NEOs for that year. With respect to 2009, base pay was a relatively small percentage of overall compensation for the NEOs. As will be further discussed below, however, a number of unusual or unique events occurred during 2009 that affected the compensation of the NEOs, including signing bonuses in connection with successful contract renegotiations, issuance and cancellation of stock options, the payment of bonuses in connection with the merger of the Company with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., and the issuance of restricted stock to key employees in connection with the merger.

A. Base Salary

Base salary is determined by the level of the position within the Company and the individual’s current and sustained performance results. Prior to the merger, the base salary of each NEO, except in the case of the Chief Executive Officer (whose base pay was set by our Compensation Committee), was set by our Chief Executive Officer, in some cases after consultation with the Compensation Committee. Following the merger, base salary for all NEOs is set by the Compensation Committee with the consultation of the Chief Executive Officer.

In determining the appropriate level of base salary for NEOs, a number of considerations may be taken into account. Historically, the following are some of the most important factors that have been considered: the number of employees supervised by the officer; the effort expended by the officer in soliciting and bringing new business or capital investments to his or her business unit; the extent to which the officer’s business unit generated new business or new capital; the travel demands placed upon the officer; and the extent to which the officer engaged in investor relation activities. While these factors are critical to our success, many of them cannot be evaluated quantitatively, so a portion of the evaluations by both the Compensation Committee and the Chief Executive Officer are necessarily subjective.

With respect to Messrs. McMorrow, Hart, and Lyle, and Ms. Ricks, salary adjustments were made effective January 1, 2008 by the Compensation Committee (with respect to Mr. McMorrow) and by Mr. McMorrow with respect to the other three executives. Mr. McMorrow’s salary was increased to $950,000, the salaries of Mr. Hart and Ms. Ricks were each increased to $600,000 (effective January 1, 2008), and Mr. Lyle’s salary was increased to $450,000 (effective June 1, 2008). The Chief Executive Officer did not recommend and the Compensation Committee did not consider any salary adjustments for these executives during 2009. In light of the continued unsettled state of the real estate market in 2009, the complex issues raised by the merger, and the long-term incentives issued in connection with the merger, the Compensation Committee concluded that increases in base salary were not appropriate.

Mr. Herrema joined the Company effective June 15, 2009. His initial base salary was set at $600,000 under his employment agreement, which was considered both appropriate in light of his job responsibilities and the fact that it was consistent with the level of base pay for other most senior executives below the Chief Executive Officer, for the reasons described in the preceding paragraph the Chief Executive Officer did not recommend and the Compensation Committee did not consider any salary adjustments for him during 2009.

B. Annual Bonus

In general, the determination of the annual bonus payable to a NEO is a discretionary determination. Because prior to 2009 we have historically not used forms of long-term incentive compensation as incentives for executive performance, annual bonuses have functioned as the primary

 

62


Table of Contents

component of variable compensation for most executive officers. Our Compensation Committee believes that annual bonuses should play a primary role in motivating executives to undertake efforts that provide increases in company value and that executive officers should be potentially eligible for bonuses that are a very significant percentage of base pay and, in the case of the most senior officers, may be a significant multiple of base pay. While the NEO’s individual performance is taken into account, historically a primary determinant of the bonus to be paid is the financial performance of the business unit over which the NEO has responsibility (in the case of the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, the primary determinant is the financial performance of the Company as a whole). Our Compensation Committee determines the Chief Executive Officer’s bonus based on its evaluation of both his and the Company’s performance. While our Compensation Committee did not determine the bonus for the other NEOs prior to the merger, it was consulted as part of the process by which the Chief Executive Officer determined or participated in the determination of bonuses for the other NEOs prior to the merger. Except as noted below, the bonus determination process did not take into account specific targets or metrics; instead, it was based on a discretionary evaluation by our Compensation Committee (in the case of the Chief Executive Officer) or the Chief Executive Officer (in the case of the other NEOs) of the performance of the executive and the business unit for which he or she had responsibility. The following bonus determinations were made for 2009:

Mr. McMorrow. With respect to our Chief Executive Officer, our Compensation Committee determined that he should receive the following payments in 2009. These payments reflect the Compensation Committee’s view that our Chief Executive Officer has played the key role in guiding the Company through the unprecedented commercial real estate problems of the last several years and positioning the Company for sustained growth in the years of ahead:

 

   

In connection with the January 2009 extension of the expiration date of the Chief Executive Officer’s employment agreement from December 31, 2014 to December 31, 2019, he received a signing bonus of $2 million. This bonus is repayable on a pro rata basis if the Chief Executive Officer terminates employment prior to the expiration of the contract term for a reason not constituting a constructive termination under the employment agreement.

 

   

In connection with the merger, our Chief Executive Officer’s employment agreement was amended to provide for the following payments:

 

   

The Chief Executive Officer received a cash bonus of $4.85 million on October 15, 2009, which was subject to repayment if the merger had not occurred on a timely basis. Our Compensation Committee made the determination to pay this bonus to the Chief Executive Officer upon consummation of the merger after taking into account several factors, including the primary roles he played in negotiating the terms of the merger and the merger agreement and the amendments to the Chief Executive Officer’s employment agreements eliminating his rights to receive cash lump sum payments otherwise due upon a change in control.

 

   

On April 10, 2006, the Chief Executive Officer borrowed $3,543,127 from the Company evidenced by a promissory note bearing simple interest at a rate of 7.5% and scheduled to mature on April 9, 2011. In connection with the merger, the Chief Executive Officer’s employment agreement was amended to provide that the remaining balance of the note in the amount of $3,454,972 plus accrued interest of $763,539 would be forgiven upon consummation of the merger. The determination of our Compensation Committee to forgive the note upon the consummation of the merger stemmed from its consideration of the Chief Executive Officer’s contributions to the Company, his primary role in negotiating the terms of the merger and the merger agreement, and the terms of the note which provides for its forgiveness in the event of certain changes in control.

 

63


Table of Contents

Ms. Ricks. It was not recommended that Ms. Ricks receive a bonus based directly on Company financial performance in 2009. She did, however, receive two bonus payments in 2009:

 

   

In connection with the January 2009 execution of a new employment agreement, she received a signing bonus of $1 million. This bonus is repayable on a pro rata basis if she terminates employment prior to the expiration of the contract term for a reason not constituting a constructive termination under the employment agreement.

 

   

In connection with the merger, Ms. Rick’s employment agreement was amended to provide a cash bonus of $2 million on October 15, 2009, which was subject to repayment if the merger had not occurred on a timely basis. Our Compensation Committee made the determination to pay a cash bonus to Ms. Ricks upon consummation of the merger after taking into account several factors, including the primary roles she played in negotiating the terms of the merger and the merger agreement and the amendments to her agreements eliminating her rights to receive cash lump sum payments otherwise due upon a change in control.

Mr. Lyle. The amount of bonus for Mr. Lyle for 2009 was $115,000. Key factors taken into account in determining the bonus amount were the significance and complexity of the financial functions that he is responsible for supervising and the very extensive efforts required to coordinate the financial reporting and related aspects of investor relationships, including preparation of monthly, quarterly, and annual reports for over 100 properties and management of the financial aspects of Kennedy-Wilson’s unsecured and secured borrowings. An additional factor taken into consideration was Mr. Lyle’s role in the process of converting Kennedy-Wilson into a public company through the merger, which required Mr. Lyle to successfully manage numerous complex and time consuming additional activities in addition to his ongoing job responsibilities.

Mr. Hart. Mr. Hart’s employment agreement with KW Multi-Family Management Group, LLC, or KW Multi-Family Management Group, provides for the creation of an annual bonus pool equal to 20% of the net operating income of KW Multi-Family Management Group for the applicable calendar year, which is defined as the gross revenue of KW Multi-Family Management Group less costs and overhead expenses (as defined in the agreement) incurred up to $2.3 million. This pool can be distributed among KW Multi-Family Management Group employees. Because this formula resulted in the creation of no bonus pool for 2009, no bonus was payable to Mr. Hart.

Mr. Herrema. Mr. Herrema’s employment contract provides for a discretionary bonus, subject to a minimum bonus of $500,000 for 2009. In accordance with the contract, he received a $500,000 bonus for 2009. While the Compensation Committee determined that Mr. Herrema had provided many valuable contributions in connection with the merger process, including negotiating key terms of the merger and the merger agreement, it was determined that an appropriate bonus award for these contributions was the $500,000 bonus provided for by the employment agreement.

C. Bonus Arrangements for 2010

In March 2010 the Compensation Committee met to consider bonus arrangements for the NEOs for 2010. While no final decisions have been made, the Compensation Committee’s current thinking is that the overall maximum bonus payable to a NEO should be based upon overall company financial performance, subject to the Compensation Committee’s complete discretion to make individual downward adjustments to the maximum bonus to reflect individual performance, performance of the executive’s bonus unit, and other appropriate factors. In order to implement this concept and to ensure that bonuses to NEOs would be deductible as performance-based compensation under section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, certain NEOs were awarded performance units in March 2010, the value of which will be dependent on the overall adjusted Company EBITDA for 2010. The details of these performance units are described in Form 8-K, filed by the Company March 31, 2010.

 

64


Table of Contents

D. Long-Term Incentive Compensation

As previously noted, prior to 2009, the Company’s compensation philosophy had focused on delivering compensation value primarily through a mixture of base pay and annual incentives. While the Compensation Committee continues to believe that annual incentives play a critical role in aligning executive and investor interests, it has also concluded that significant long-term incentives should also play a major role in aligning executive actions with the long-term interests of the shareholders.

2009 Stock Option Grants. Our Compensation Committee determined to issue stock options in early 2009 to senior executives and members of the board of directors. Two types of options were granted by our Compensation Committee: (1) options with vesting only contingent on continued service for a specified amount of time, which were intended to reward contributions to the Company and act as a retention incentive; and (2) options with vesting contingent upon both continued service for a specified amount of time and upon meeting specific EBITDA performance goals set forth in the option agreement (if the EBITDA target for a previous year was not met, the options could still be earned if a “catch up hurdle” were to be met in a later year). A total of 750,000 stock options were issued, of which the following amounts were issued to the NEOs (the number in parentheses represent options with vesting contingent upon meeting EBITDA performance goals): 150,000 options to each of Mr. McMorrow and Ms. Ricks; 100,000 options to each of Mr. Herrema (100,000) and Mr. Hart (77,400); and 20,000 options to Mr. Lyle (15,708). Our Compensation Committee’s determination of the amount of options granted to each NEO took into account that optionee’s contribution to the Company and the amount of options that was being awarded to other officers with comparable levels of responsibility. The options were scheduled to vest over seven years in equal annual installments with a strike price of $30.

As part of the negotiations between Prospect Acquisition Corp. and Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. leading up to the merger, it was agreed that all of these stock options would be cancelled upon the closing. In addition to restricted stock that would be issued to the optionees in replacement of their options, the optionees also became entitled to payments of $2 per option for each cancelled option, resulting in payments of $300,000 to each of Mr. McMorrow and Ms. Ricks, $200,000 to each of Mr. Herrema and Mr. Hart, and $40,000 to Mr. Lyle.

Restricted Stock. In connection with the merger, it was determined that key executives would receive a substantial grant of restricted stock, both as a replacement for the cancelled stock options and as an incentive to sustained long-term performance and as a retention incentive. Specifically, to reward and incentivize our key employees and management after the merger, up to 2,475,000 shares of common stock were reserved for issuance under the Company’s 2009 Equity Participation Plan, or the 2009 Plan. In connection with the merger, certain of our officers, directors and key employees were issued an aggregate of 2,357,443 restricted shares of common stock under the 2009 Plan. Mr. McMorrow, Ms. Ricks and Mr. Herrema each were granted 556,875 shares of restricted shares and Mr. Lyle and Mr. Hart each were granted 77,344 shares of restricted stock. Under the terms of the restricted stock award agreements of the grantees that were awarded restricted shares in connection with the merger, the restricted shares are scheduled to vest in equal installments over a five year period from the date of grant if on each vesting date: (i) the total acquisition cost of assets owned or managed on behalf of third parties by the Company (Gross Assets Under Management) meets certain targets, as of such vesting date and (ii) the grantee is an employee of the Company or its subsidiaries, as of such vesting date (or, in the case of an independent contractor, the grantee continues to provide services). The agreements further provide that, if the awardee remains employed until a vesting date, but the Gross Assets Under Management target is not met, the shares shall nevertheless become vested if the Gross Assets Under Management target is met as of a subsequent vesting date. Also, the agreements further provide that the Gross Assets Under Management target may be increased and additional vesting requirements may be provided for annually in the Company’s sole discretion upon written notice to the Awardee.

 

65


Table of Contents

Vesting Date

   Target Gross  Assets
Under
Management

November 13, 2010

   $ 3.00 billion

November 13, 2011

   $ 3.30 billion

November 13, 2012

   $ 3.63 billion

November 13, 2013

   $ 3.99 billion

November 13, 2014

   $ 4.39 billion

Notwithstanding the foregoing, if the engagement of a grantee that is an employee or consultant of the Company or its subsidiaries is terminated by the Company or its subsidiaries without cause (as defined in the award agreements) or by the grantee for “Good Reason”, the requirement that the grantee be engaged with the Company or its subsidiaries as of each vesting date shall no longer apply going forward, so that, assuming the target Gross Assets Under Management is met as of a particular vesting date, all restricted shares subject to vesting as of such vesting date shall thereupon become fully vested. As used herein, “Good Reason” means the voluntary termination of the engagement of the grantee with the Company or its subsidiaries within 6 months of the Company or the Company’s subsidiaries: (1) instructing the grantee to provide services full-time or substantially full-time at any location not acceptable to the grantee (other than the Company’s main headquarters) that is more than 50 miles from the grantee’s principal place of work and more than 50 miles from the grantee’s principal residence; (2) eliminating or materially reducing the grantee’s duties with the Company or the Company’s subsidiaries or (3) materially reducing the grantee’s base pay (or base compensation). In addition, in the event of a “Change of Control” as defined in the 2009 Plan, any unvested restricted shares of common stock that have not previously been forfeited will become vested, subject to certain limitations.

Long-Term Cash Incentives. Our Compensation Committee amended Mr. McMorrow’s employment agreement and Mr. Ricks employment agreement to make certain long-term cash incentives available, contingent upon the consummation of the merger. The Compensation Committee’s decisions to make these incentives available took into account several factors, including the primary roles they played in negotiating the terms of the merger and the merger agreement and the amendments to their agreements eliminating their rights to receive cash lump sum payments otherwise due upon a change in control.

 

   

Mr. McMorrow and Ms. Ricks received “performance unit awards” under the 2009 Plan which entitled them to receive $2.425 million and $1.0 million, respectively, on April 1, 2010, provided that the Company’s assets under management were at least $3 billion as of March 31, 2010 and the executive remained employed through such date. This performance target was met and these awards have been paid.

 

   

Mr. McMorrow’s and Ms. Ricks’ employment agreements were also amended to provide that they would receive additional “performance unit awards” under the 2009 Plan entitling them to receive cash payments in the amounts of $4.425 and $1.0 million, respectively, on January 1, 2011, provided that the Company’s assets under management are at least $3 billion as of December 31, 2010 and he or she, as applicable, remained employed by the post-merger company through January 1, 2011. On November 18, 2009, Mr. McMorrow and Ms. Ricks waived their right to receive the January 1, 2011 bonuses.

E. Other Executive Benefits

NEOs are entitled to employee benefits generally available to all full time employees (subject to fulfilling any minimum service period). These employee benefits include, among other things, vacation and health and welfare benefits generally available to all employees. We believe these benefits are generally competitive with those offered by similar companies in the markets in which we operate.

 

66


Table of Contents

Our employees, including the NEOs participate in a tax-qualified 401(k) plan, pursuant to which we may match a certain portion of employee contributions. We may annually match 50% of employee contributions to the plan, limited to employee contributions equal to 4% of compensation, but not to exceed $1,500 for any participant.

The Chief Executive Officer receives certain additional benefits, which includes a car allowance of $18,000 and the use of certain club memberships that are maintained by us for business purposes only. Further details regarding these benefits are contained in the summary compensation table and accompanying footnotes. These benefits are provided because our Compensation Committee has concluded that they are generally competitive with those provided to comparable executives or provide benefits to us which are appropriate in light of their cost.

F. Employment Agreements

During 2009 we were a party to employment agreements with all of our NEOs. Additional information regarding the employment agreements of our NEOs may be found under the subheadings below “Termination and Change in Control Benefits”.

Mr. McMorrow. As amended effective February 1, 2009, the employment agreement in effect with Mr. McMorrow generally provides for base salary of $950,000, a bonus at the sole discretion of our Compensation Committee, and insurance coverages and other benefits generally available to officers. In addition, it provides for entrance fees and monthly dues for two country clubs. The term of Mr. McMorrow’s agreement extends through December 31, 2019. As previously described, Mr. McMorrow received a $2 million signing bonus in connection with the execution of this agreement.

In connection with the merger, Mr. McMorrow’s employment agreement was amended to provide for the previously described cash payments on October 15, 2009, April 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011 (this last payment was subsequently waived). It also provided for the note forgiveness previously described. It further provided for the grant of 556,875 restricted shares upon the terms and conditions set forth above. The amendments further provided for: the removal of certain benefits in the event of a change in control, the addition of certain severance benefits if the executive resigns on account of a change in location or a material reduction in duties, a reduction in the amount of payments or benefits payable or provided to him under his employment agreement or otherwise to ensure that no payment or benefit is subject to the excise tax imposed by Section 4999 of the Code (certain golden parachute payments) which reduction may, in certain circumstances, result in the repayment of certain previously paid amounts (plus earnings) to the Company, and to achieve compliance with Section 409A of the Code.

Ms. Ricks. Ms. Ricks entered into an employment agreement with Kennedy-Wilson effective February 1, 2009. The agreement extends through January 31, 2014. The employment agreement provides for base salary of $600,000, a bonus at the sole discretion of our Compensation Committee, and other benefits generally available to our employees. As previously described, Ms. Ricks received a $1 million signing bonus in connection with the execution of this agreement.

In connection with the merger, Ms. Ricks employment agreement was amended to provide for the previously described cash payments on October 15, 2009, April 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011 (this last payment was subsequently waived). It further provided for the grant of 556,875 restricted shares upon the terms and conditions set forth above. The amendments further provided for: the removal of certain benefits in the event of a change in control, the addition of certain severance benefits if the executive resigns on account of a change in location or a material reduction in duties, a reduction in the amount of payments or benefits payable or provided to her under her employment agreement or otherwise to ensure that no payment or benefit is subject to the excise tax imposed by Section 4999 of the Code (certain golden parachute payments) which reduction may, in certain circumstances, result in the repayment of certain previously paid amounts (plus earnings) to the Company, and to achieve compliance with Section 409A of the Code.

 

67


Table of Contents

Mr. Hart. Mr. Hart entered into an employment agreement with KW Multi-Family Management Group dated January 1, 2006, which has been subsequently amended and extended on a year-to-year basis. The employment agreement was most recently amended as of January 1, 2009 to extend the term through December 31, 2009. The agreement has now expired. In addition to base salary of $600,000, the agreement provided for Mr. Hart’s participation in the annual bonus pool equal to 20% of the net operating income of KW Multi-Family Management Group for the applicable calendar year, plus benefits generally available to employees of KW Multi-Family Management Group. The now expired agreement provided that, in the event Mr. Hart’s employment was terminated by KW Multi-Family Management Group without cause, he would be entitled to receive base salary, participation in the bonus pool and benefits through the end of the term.

Mr. Lyle. Mr. Lyle entered into an employment agreement with us on April 1, 1996, which has been subsequently amended and extended on a year-to-year basis. The employment agreement was most recently amended to extend the term through December 31, 2009. The agreement has now expired. In addition to base salary of $450,000, the agreement provided for a discretionary bonus of up to 100% of base salary and benefits generally available to employees of the Company. The now expired agreement provided that, in the event Mr. Lyle’s employment was terminated without cause, he would be entitled to receive base salary, participation in the bonus pool and benefits through the end of the term.

Mr. Herrema. Mr. Herrema entered into an employment agreement with us on June 15, 2009 to serve as the Executive Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO of Kennedy-Wilson Capital Markets through December 31, 2010. Under the employment agreement, Mr. Herrema is entitled to a base salary of $600,000 and a discretionary bonus determined by the Compensation Committee, subject to a $500,000 minimum bonus for 2009. The agreement also provides for benefits generally available to employees of the Company.

Mr. Herrema also entered into an amendment to his employment agreement in connection with the merger which provided for, among other things: the extension of his employment term from December 31, 2010 to January 31, 2014, unless earlier terminated pursuant to the terms of the agreement, the addition of certain severance benefits if the executive resigns on account of a change in location or a material reduction in duties, the grant of 556,875 shares of restricted stock pursuant to the 2009 Plan and upon the terms and conditions set forth above, and a reduction in the amount of payments or benefits payable or provided to him under her employment agreement or otherwise to ensure that no payment or benefit is subject to the excise tax imposed by Section 4999 of the Code (certain golden parachute payments) which reduction may, in certain circumstances, result in the repayment of certain previously paid amounts (plus earnings) to the Company, and to achieve compliance with Section 409A of the Code.

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

Our Compensation Committee was established on November 13, 2009 and consists of Norman Creighton (Chairman), Cathy Hendrickson and David Minella. Mr. Minella served as our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman prior to the consummation of the merger between our wholly owned subsidiary and Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. on November 13, 2009. No other member of the Compensation Committee is (or ever was) an officer or employee of the Company or any of its subsidiaries. There are no Compensation Committee interlocks as defined by applicable SEC rules.

Compensation Polices and Practices As They Relate to the Company’s Risk Management

The Company believes that its compensation policies and practices for all employees, including executive officers, do not create risks that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

68


Table of Contents

2009 Summary Compensation Table

 

Name and Principal

Position

   Year    Salary    Bonus    Stock
Awards(8)
   Option
Awards(8)
   Non-
Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensation
   Change in
Pension
Value and
Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
   All  Other
Compensation
    Total

William J. McMorrow

   2009    $ 950,000    $ 6,850,000    $ 2,490,094    $ 2,173,500    $ —      $ —      $ 4,600,080 (1)   $ 17,063,674

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

   2008    $ 950,000    $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ 18,000 (1)   $ 968,000

Freeman A. Lyle

   2009    $ 450,000    $ 115,000    $ 360,632    $ 289,800    $ —      $ —      $ 41,500 (2)   $ 1,256,932

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

   2008    $ 410,417    $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —        $ 410,417

Mary Ricks

   2009    $ 600,000    $ 3,000,000    $ 2,490,094    $ 2,173,500    $ —      $ —      $ 300,750 (4)   $ 8,564,344

Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Commercial Investment Group(3)

   2008    $ 600,000    $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —        $ 600,000

Robert E. Hart

   2009    $ 600,000    $ —      $ —      $ 1,449,000    $ —      $ —      $ 206,804 (5)   $ 2,255,804

President, KW Multi-Family Management Group

   2008    $ 600,000    $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —        $ 600,000

Donald J. Herrema

   2009    $ 325,000    $ 500,000    $ 3,377,094    $ 1,449,000    $ —      $ —      $ 201,500 (7)   $ 5,852,594

Executive Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and CEO, KW Capital Markets(6)

                         

 

(1) Includes $18,000 in car allowance payments in 2008 and 2009, $1,500 in Company contributions to Mr. McMorrow’s account in the Company’s tax qualified 401(k) savings plan for 2009. Also included for 2009 is $3,454,972 of note forgiveness and the related accrued interest of $763,539, $62,068 of payroll taxes related to the note forgiveness and $300,000 related to the cancellation of stock option awards. We maintain two corporate club memberships that are made available to the Chief Executive Officer. Since all use during 2008 and 2009 was business use, accordingly no amount is recorded as “All Other Compensation” with respect to these memberships.
(2) Consists of $1,500 in Company contributions to Mr. Lyle’s account in the Company’s tax qualified 401(k) savings plan and $40,000 related to the cancellation of stock option awards.
(3) During 2008, Ms. Ricks served as President of the Company’s commercial group. During 2009, Ms. Ricks served as CEO of the Company’s commercial investment group.
(4) Consists of $750 in Company contributions to Ms. Rick’s account in the Company’s tax qualified 401(k) savings plan and $300,000 related to the cancellation of stock option awards.
(5) Consists of $1,500 in Company contributions to Mr. Hart’s account in the Company’s tax qualified 401(k) savings plan, $200,000 related to the cancellation of stock option awards and $5,304 in commissions.
(6) Mr. Herrema joined the Company in June 2009.
(7) Consists of $1,500 in Company contributions to Mr. Herrema’s account in the Company’s tax qualified 401(k) savings plan, $200,000 related to the cancellation of stock option awards.

 

69


Table of Contents
(8) The amounts in this column reflect the aggregate grant date fair value of each restricted stock or option award computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718. Information regarding the valuation assumptions used in the calculations are included in Note 17 to the Company’s financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009 contained elsewhere in this prospectus. For additional information on these awards, see “Grant of Plan-Based Awards Table” and “Compensation Discussion and Analysis.” The amount of the stock award was calculated by taking the incremental value of the grant date fair value of the restricted stock award less the fair value of the option award on the date of modification. The share price on the date of modification for the restricted stock award was $9.25 per share. The fair value of the option award on the date of modification was calculated using the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model. The option pricing model inputs used to determine the fair value were an expected stock option term of 6.29 years, expected volatility of 41.9%, expected risk free rate of 2.95%, and no expected dividends.

Grants Of Plan Based Awards

The following table provides information about plan based awards granted to NEOs in 2009: (1) the grant date; (2) the estimated future payouts under non-equity incentive plan awards, which is discussed in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Elements of Compensation—Long-Term Incentive Compensation—Long-Term Cash Incentives”; (3) the number of shares of restricted stock grants in 2009, which is discussed in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Elements of Compensation—Long-Term Incentive Compensation—Restricted Stock”; (4) the number of stock option awards, which consist of the number of shares underlying stock options awarded; (5) the exercise price of the stock option awards; and (6) the fair value of each equity award computed under FASB ASC Topic 718 as of the grant date.

 

          Estimated
Future Payouts
Under Incentive
Plan Awards(1)
   All Other
Option
Awards:
Number  of
Securities
Underlying
Options
(#)(2)
   Exercise or
Base Price
of Option
Awards
($/Sh)(3)
   Grant Date
Fair Value
of Stock
and Option
Awards
($)(4)
     Grant
Date
   Non-Equity
Target ($)
   Equity
Target (#)
        

William McMorrow

   12/10/09    2,425,000    556,875          2,490,094
   03/25/09          150,000    30.00    2,173,500

Freeman Lyle

   12/10/09       77,344          360,632
   03/25/09          20,000    30.00    289,800

Mary Ricks

   12/10/09    1,000,000    556,875          2,490,094
   03/25/09          150,000    30.00    2,173,500

Robert E. Hart

   12/10/09       77,344          —  
   03/25/09          100,000    30.00    1,449,000

Donald J. Herrema

   12/10/09       556,875          3,377,094
   03/25/09          100,000    30.00    1,449,000

 

(1) These columns show the potential value of the payout if the performance target is satisfied. See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Elements of Compensation—Long-Term Incentive Compensation” for a description of the performance targets.
(2) The amounts shown in All Other Option Awards show the stock options granted in 2009.
(3) The exercise price of each option was determined to be the share price as of the close of trading on the date of grant.
(4) This column shows the full grant date fair value of restricted stock awards and stock options under FASB ASC Topic 718 granted to the named executive officers during 2009. The options consist of options to purchase shares of common stock of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., which was merged with a subsidiary of the Company on November 13, 2009. In connection with the merger, all outstanding options were cancelled. See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Elements of Compensation—Long-Term Incentive Compensation—2009 Stock Option Grants”. See note 8 to “2009 Summary Compensation Table” for a discussion regarding the valuation of the restricted stock awards.

 

70


Table of Contents

Outstanding Equity Awards At 2009 Fiscal Year-End

The following table sets forth outstanding equity awards held by our NEOs at December 31, 2009.

 

     Stock Awards

Name

   Number
of Shares  or
Units of Stock
That Have
Not Vested
(#)
   Market Value
of Shares or
Units of Stock
That Have
Not Vested
($)
   Equity Incentive
Plan Awards:
Number of
Unearned Shares,
Units or Other
Rights That
Have Not Vested
(#)(1)
   Equity Incentive
Plan Awards:
Market or
Payout Value of
Unearned Shares,
Units or Other
Rights That
Have Not Vested
($)(2)

William McMorrow

   —      —      556,875    $ 4,984,031

Freeman Lyle

   —      —      77,344    $ 692,229

Mary Ricks

   —      —      556,875    $ 4,984,031

Robert E. Hart

   —      —      77,344    $ 692,229

Donald J. Herrema

   —      —      556,875    $ 4,984,031

 

(1) For a description of the restricted stock held by our NEOs on December 31, 2009, see “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Elements of Compensation—Long-Term Incentive Compensation—Restricted Stock”. The restricted stock was granted under our 2009 Plan which is described below.
(2) Value is based on the closing price of our Common Stock of $8.95 on December 31, 2009, as reported on NYSE Amex.

2009 Equity Participation Plan

Our 2009 Equity Participation Plan, or the 2009 Plan, was approved by our stockholders on November 13, 2009. The principal features of the 2009 Plan are summarized below, but the summary is qualified in its entirety by reference to the text of the 2009 Plan.

Administration of the 2009 Plan. The 2009 Plan is administered by our Compensation Committee.

Securities Subject to the 2009 Plan. Pursuant to the 2009 Plan, the maximum aggregate number of shares of common stock that may be issued is 2,475,000 shares.

Eligibility. Our and our affiliates’ employees (including officers), nonemployee consultants and nonemployee directors are eligible to receive awards under the 2009 Plan.

Awards Under the 2009 Plan. The 2009 Plan provides that the Compensation Committee may grant or issue stock options, restricted stock awards, unrestricted stock awards, restricted stock units, performance unit awards, performance share awards, distribution equivalent rights, stock appreciation rights, or any combination thereof.

Non-Qualified Stock Options. Non-qualified stock options (“NQSOs”) provide for the right to purchase shares of common stock at a price determined by the Compensation Committee which may not be less than fair market value on the date of grant, subject to certain adjustments, and usually will become

 

71


Table of Contents

exercisable (in the discretion of the Compensation Committee) in one or more installments after the grant date, subject to the completion of the applicable vesting period. NQSOs may be granted for any term specified by the Compensation Committee, but may not exceed ten years.

Incentive Stock Options. Incentive stock options (“ISOs”) are designed to comply with the provisions of Section 422 of the Code, and will be subject to certain restrictions contained in the Code. Among such restrictions, ISOs must have an exercise price not less than the fair market value of a share of common stock on the date of grant, may only be granted to employees, and must not be exercisable after a period of ten years measured from the date of grant.

Restricted and Unrestricted Stock. Restricted stock may be issued at such price, if any, and may be made subject to such restrictions (including time vesting or satisfaction of performance milestones), as may be determined by the Compensation Committee. Restricted stock, typically, is subject to forfeiture if certain conditions or restrictions are not met. In general, restricted stock may not be sold, or otherwise hypothecated or transferred, until the vesting restrictions applicable to such shares are removed or expire.

Restricted Stock Unit Awards. The holder of a restricted stock unit will be entitled to receive payment in cash or shares of common stock, based upon the number of restricted stock units awarded to the holder, if the holder satisfies individual service-based vesting requirements. The payment will be made no later than the fifteenth day of the third calendar month following the end of the calendar year in which the restricted stock unit first becomes vested. The payment will be subject to a “substantial risk of forfeiture” under Section 409A of the Code.

Performance Unit Awards. Performance unit awards entitle the holder to a cash payment upon the satisfaction of predetermined goals and objectives relating to the performance of the holder, the Company and/or its affiliates that is based upon the dollar value assigned to such unit under the award agreement. The performance unit award agreement may provide that, depending on the degree of performance achieved, different amounts of performance units, or no performance units, may be awarded.

Performance Share Awards. Performance share awards entitle the holder to receive shares of common stock upon the satisfaction of certain performance goals and objectives determined by the Compensation Committee. At the time of such award, the Compensation Committee may prescribe additional terms and conditions or restrictions relating to the awards, including, but not limited to, rules pertaining to the effect of termination of the holder’s employment, director status or consultant status prior to the expiration of the applicable period. The holder of a performance share award will have no rights as a stockholder of the Company until such time, if any, as the holder actually receives shares pursuant to the award.

Distribution Equivalent Rights. Distribution equivalent rights entitle a holder to receive bookkeeping credits, cash payments and/or common stock distributions equal in amount to the distributions that would have been made to the holder if such holder held a specified number of shares of common stock during the period the holder held the right.

Stock Appreciation Rights. SARs provide for the payment of an amount to the holder based upon increases in the price of common stock over a set base price. The base price of any SAR granted under the 2009 Plan must be at least 100% of the fair market value of a share of common stock on the date of grant. Under the 2009 Plan, SARs will be settled in cash or shares of common stock, or a combination of both.

 

72


Table of Contents

Termination and Change in Control Benefits

This section quantifies the additional amounts that would be payable to the NEOs in the event of their termination or a change in control as of December 31, 2009. For this purpose, the closing stock price of $8.95 on that date has been used.

The restricted stock agreements applicable to all the NEOs provide that, in the event of a change in control, as defined in the 2009 Plan, the restricted shares become immediately vested. If an awardee is fired without cause or quits for good reason, the continued employment requirement with respect to the restricted shares is waived, but the Gross Assets Under Management target must continue to be satisfied.

Mr. McMorrow

Mr. McMorrow’s employment agreement provides that, in the event his employment with the Company is terminated: (i) by the Company without cause; (ii) due to death or disability or (iii) by Mr. McMorrow with cause, he will receive basic salary and benefit continuation (as described under the employment agreement) throughout the remaining term of the agreement. If Mr. McMorrow’s employment is terminated by the Company with cause or by Mr. McMorrow without cause, he will receive compensation earned to the date of termination. In addition, the requirement of continued employment with respect to the cash performance award contingently payable April 1, 2010, is eliminated if he is fired without cause or quits for good reason.

Ms. Ricks and Mr. Herrema

Pursuant to their employment agreements, if Mr. Herrema or Ms. Ricks is terminated without cause, each executive will be entitled to base salary and benefit continuation (as described under the employment agreement) through the remainder of term of his or her respective agreement. In addition, the requirement of continued employment with respect to the cash performance award contingently payable to Ms. Ricks on April 1, 2010, is eliminated if she is fired without cause or quits for good reason.

The table below sets forth estimated payments with respect to Mr. McMorrow, Ms. Ricks, and Mr. Herrema upon the termination of employment with the Company under various circumstances and upon a change in control. The amounts in the table assume that, in the case of accelerated vesting with respect to the restricted stock granted these individuals and the cash performance awards granted Mr. McMorrow and Ms. Ricks, any applicable performance contingencies will be subsequently satisfied.

 

73


Table of Contents
     Involuntary
For Cause
or Without
Good Reason
   Involuntary
Without  Cause
or For
Good Reason
   Death /
Disability
   CIC Only
(No Termination)
    Involuntary
Without
Cause or For
Good Reason
In Connection
With CIC
 

McMorrow

             

Cash Severance

   $ 0    $ 11,925,000    $ 9,500,000    $ 0      $ 11,925,000   

Equity Award Acceleration

     0      4,984,031      0      4,984,031        4,984,031   

Continued Benefits

     0      213,000      213,000        213,000   

280G Cutback(1)

     N/A      N/A      N/A      0        (2,516,300 )
                                     

Total

   $ 0    $ 17,122,031    $ 9,713,000    $ 4,984,031      $ 14,605,731   
                                     

Ricks

             

Cash Severance

   $ 0    $ 3,450,000    $ 0    $ 0      $ 3,450,000   

Equity Award Acceleration

     0      4,984,031      0      4,984,031        4,984,031   

Continued Benefits

     0      13,475      0      0        13,475   

280G Cutback(1)

     N/A      N/A      N/A      0        (3,180,842 )
                                     

Total

   $ 0    $ 8,447,506    $ 0    $ 4,984,031      $ 5,266,664   
                                     

Herrema

             

Cash Severance

   $ 0    $ 2,450,000    $ 0    $ 0      $ 2,450,000   

Equity Award Acceleration

     0      4,984,031      0      4,984,031        4,984,031   

Continued Benefits

     0      13,475      0      0        13,475   

280G Cutback(1)

     N/A      N/A      N/A      (1,084,032 )     (3,547,507 )
                                     

Total

   $ 0    $ 7,447,506    $ 0    $ 3,899,999      $ 3,899,999   
                                     

 

(1) The employment agreements of these executives provide that, in the event that CIC benefits would trigger the excise tax under Section 4999 of the Code, benefits are to be cut back to $1 below the tax threshold. This row reflects any necessary cutbacks in benefits.

Mr. Lyle and Mr. Hart

As of December 31, 2009, neither Mr. Lyle nor Mr. Hart was subject to an employment agreement, since their employment agreements expired on that date. Accordingly, the only payments to which either would be entitled is $692,229, the value attributable to the accelerated vesting of the 77,344 restricted shares that have been issued to each of them, which acceleration occurs under the circumstances and subject to the conditions set forth in the second paragraph of this section.

 

74


Table of Contents

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

On April 10, 2006, William J. McMorrow, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, borrowed $3,543,127 from Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. evidenced by a promissory note bearing simple interest at a rate of 7.5% and scheduled to mature on April 9, 2011 (the “McMorrow Note”). The balance of the McMorrow Note in the amount of $3,454,972 plus accrued interest of $763,539 was forgiven upon our consummation of our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. The determination of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.’s Compensation Committee to forgive the note upon the consummation of the merger stemmed from its consideration of Mr. McMorrow’s contributions to Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., Mr. McMorrow’s primary role in negotiating the terms of the merger and the merger agreement, and the terms of the note which provided for its forgiveness in the event of certain changes in control.

In November 2008, Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. issued a convertible subordinated note with a principal amount of $30 million to Guardian. Thomas Sorell, our director, is the Executive Vice President and Chief Investment Officer of Guardian. The Guardian Note bears interest at a fixed rate of 7%, payable quarterly, and the outstanding principal is due on November 3, 2018. Following the consummation of our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., Guardian was provided with an option to convert, in whole or in part, the outstanding principal balance and accrued interest of the Guardian Note into shares of our common stock at a conversion price of $9.86 per share any time prior to May 3, 2017. At any time on or after the ninth anniversary of the original issue date of the note and prior to the due date, we may demand that Guardian convert the note in accordance with its terms. As of May 4, 2010, the outstanding principal balance and accrued interest of the Guardian Note were $30 million and $0, respectively and the estimated number of shares of common stock into which the Guardian Note is convertible is 3,042,466. In addition, Guardian has from time to time entered into various loan and investment transactions involving Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and its subsidiaries and affiliates relating to real estate investments.

In connection with the issuance of the Guardian Note, Guardian entered into a shareholders agreement with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., William McMorrow, Mary Ricks and Lyle Freeman pursuant to which the parties agreed to appoint one person designated by Guardian as a member of the board of directors of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. On October 8, 2009, Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and Guardian entered into a letter agreement pursuant to which the parties agreed, effective upon consummation of our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc., to terminate the shareholders agreement subject to entering into a voting agreement to provide Guardian with the right to designate a director to our board of directors.

Kulik, Gottesman, Mouton & Siegel LLP has served as general legal counsel to Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and received approximately $727,610 in legal fees for the year ended December 31, 2009. Kent Mouton, our director, is a partner with Kulik, Gottesman, Mouton & Siegel LLP and holds approximately a 25% interest in the firm.

Solomon, Winnett & Rosenfield, Certified Public Accountants, Inc. has provided certain tax consulting, preparation and general advice to Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. and received approximately $219,000 in fees for the year ended December 31, 2009. Jerry Solomon, a director of Kennedy-Wilson, is a principal of Solomon, Winnett & Rosenfield, Certified Public Accountants, Inc. and holds approximately a 25% interest in the firm.

All ongoing and future transactions between us and any director or member of our management team, or their respective affiliates, including financing, will be on terms believed by us at that time, based upon other similar arrangements known to us, to be no less favorable than are available from unaffiliated third parties. Such transactions will require prior approval in each instance by our Audit Committee.

 

75


Table of Contents

PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS

The following table sets forth certain information regarding beneficial ownership of common stock as of May 28, 2010 by (i) each person known to us to own beneficially more than 5% of our common stock; (ii) each of our directors and each of our named executive officers; and (iii) all named executive officers and directors as a group. Unless otherwise indicated: (a) the business address for all of the named executive officers and directors named below is c/o Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc., 9701 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 700, Beverly Hills, California 90212 and (b) each beneficial owner has sole voting and dispositive power with respect to all of the reported shares of common stock beneficially owned by such beneficial owner.

 

Name of Beneficial Owner

   Amount and
Nature of
Beneficial
Ownership
    Approximate
Percentage  of
Outstanding
Common
Stock(1)
 

5% Stockholders:

    

The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America(6)

   5,042,466      10.9

Morgan Stanley(7)

   2,089,420      5.1

Royce & Associates, LLC(8)

   5,978,928      14.5

Flat Ridge Investments LLC(2)

   3,532,127 (3)   8.6 %

Fairfax Financial Holdings Limited and affiliates (9)

   8,058,018      16.3

Named Executive Officers and Directors:

    

David A. Minella(4)

   3,532,127 (3)   8.6 %

William J. McMorrow

   13,802,755 (5)   33.4 %

Mary Ricks

   1,112,579      2.7 %

Freeman A. Lyle

   705,724      1.7 %

Robert E. Hart

   146,754      *   

Donald J. Herrema

   656,875      1.6 %

Kent Mouton

   58,542      *   

Jerry R. Solomon

   57,837      *   

Norman Creighton

   230,574      *   

Thomas Sorell

   0      *   

Cathy Hendrickson

   3,094      *   

All named executive officers and directors as a group

   20,306,861      49.2 %

 

* Less than 1%

 

76


Table of Contents
(1) Amount and applicable percentage of ownership is based on 41,284,658 shares of the Company’s common stock outstanding on May 28, 2010.
(2) David A. Minella is the Managing Member of Flat Ridge Investments LLC, and may be deemed to beneficially own the same number of shares of common stock reported by Flat Ridge Investments LLC. Mr. Minella disclaims beneficial ownership of any shares in which he does not have a pecuniary interest. Mr. Minella and Flat Ridge Investments LLC have shared voting and dispositive power with respect to all of the reported shares of common stock. The business address of Mr. Minella and Flat Ridge Investments LLC is 814 Hollow Tree Ridge Road, Darien, Connecticut 06820.
(3) Includes 2,710,741 sponsors warrants beneficially owned by Flat Ridge Investments LLC.
(4) David A. Minella is the Managing Member of Flat Ridge Investments LLC, and may be deemed to beneficially own the 3,532,127 shares of common stock beneficially owned by Flat Ridge Investments LLC as of the record date, the 821,386 shares of common stock beneficially owned by Flat Ridge Investments LLC after taking into account the forfeiture and cancellation of the founders shares in connection with our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc. on November 13, 2009, and the 2,710,741 sponsor warrants beneficially owned by Flat Ridge Investments LLC. Mr. Minella disclaims beneficial ownership of any shares in which he does not have a pecuniary interest.
(5) Includes 90,851 shares of common stock beneficially owned by Leslie McMorrow, Mr. McMorrow’s wife, and 52,821 shares of common stock beneficially owned by Tyler McMorrow, Mr. McMorrow’s son. Mr. McMorrow disclaims beneficial ownership of the shares owned by his wife and son.
(6) The address of the holder is 7 Hanover Square, New York, New York 10004. The shares beneficially owned by the holder include 2,000,000 shares of common stock and 3,042,466 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest under the Guardian Note as of March 15, 2010.
(7) The address of the holder is 1585 Broadway, New York, NY 10036. The securities being reported on by Morgan Stanley as a parent holding company are owned, or may be deemed to be beneficially owned, by FrontPoint Partners LLC, an investment adviser in accordance with Exchange Act Rule 13d-1(b)(1)(ii)(E), as amended. FrontPoint Partners LLC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Morgan Stanley. The address of FrontPoint Partners LLC is Two Greenwich Plaza, Greenwich, CT 06830.
(8) The address of the holder is 745 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10151.
(9) The shares beneficially owned by the holders represent shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of 100,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock. Each of Fairfax Financial Holdings Limited, V. Prem Watsa, 1109519 Ontario Limited, The Sixty Two Investment Company Limited and 810679 Ontario Limited has shared voting and dispositive power with respect to 8,058,018 shares. Odyssey America Reinsurance Corporation has shared voting and dispositive power with respect to 4,448,027 shares. The address of Fairfax Financial Holdings Limited, V. Prem Watsa, 1109519 Ontario Limited and 810679 Ontario Limited is 95 Wellington Street West, Suite 800, Toronto, Ontario M5J 2N7, Canada. The address of Sixty Two Investment Company Limited is 1600 Cathedral Place, 925 West Georgia St, Vancouver, British Columbia V6C 3L3, Canada. The address of Odyssey America Reinsurance Corporation is 300 First Stamford Place, Stamford, CT 06902.

 

77


Table of Contents

SELLING SECURITY HOLDERS

The warrants and shares of common stock being offered by the Selling Security Holders are those that have been issued to the Selling Stockholders and/or are issuable to the Selling Security Holders upon exercise of outstanding warrants. The term “Selling Security Holders” as used in this prospectus, refers to the persons listed in the table below, and the pledgees, donees, permitted transferees, assignees, successors and others who later come to hold any of the Selling Security Holders’ interests in the shares covered by this prospectus other than through a public sale. We are registering the warrants and shares of common stock in order to permit the Selling Security Holders to offer the warrants and shares for resale from time to time. Unless otherwise described below, to our knowledge, no Selling Security Holder nor any of its affiliates has held any position or office with, been employed by or otherwise has had any material relationship with us or our affiliates during the three years prior to the date of this prospectus.

Information with respect to beneficial ownership is based upon information provided by or on behalf of the Selling Security Holders. The following table sets forth information as of May 28, 2010 (assuming that this prospectus was declared effective on such date) regarding the common stock beneficially owned by each Selling Security Holder that may be offered using this prospectus.

A Selling Security Holder may offer all, some or none of the warrants or shares of the common stock set forth below. Information about the Selling Security Holders may change over time. Changed information will be set forth in supplements to this prospectus or amendments to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part, if and as required. We have no arrangements or understandings with any stockholder to distribute the securities.

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC, and includes voting or investment power with respect to the securities. To our knowledge, except as indicated by footnote, and subject to community property laws where applicable, the persons named in the table below have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares of common stock shown as beneficially owned by them. Shares of common stock underlying securities that currently are exercisable or convertible or are scheduled to become exercisable or convertible for or into shares of common stock within 60 days after May 28, 2010 (assuming that this prospectus was declared effective on such date) are deemed to be outstanding in calculating the percentage ownership of each listed person or group but are not deemed to be outstanding as to any other person or group. Percentage of beneficial ownership is based on 41,284,658 shares of common stock outstanding as of May 28, 2010. The table below assumes that all of the securities being offered by the Selling Security Holders under this prospectus are sold.

 

78


Table of Contents

Name of Selling Stockholder

   Number of
Shares  of
Common Stock
Beneficially
Owned  Prior
to the Offering
   Total Number
of Shares  of
Common Stock
Owned  Being
Registered
   Number of
Shares  of
Common Stock
Beneficially
Owned  After
the Offering(1)
   Percentage of
Common  Stock
Beneficially
Owned After
the  Offering(1)
 

Flat Ridge Investments LLC(2)

   3,532,127    3,532,127    0    0   

LLM Structured Equity Fund L.P.(3)

   1,814,862    1,814,862    0    0   

LLM Investors L.P.(3)

   37,037    37,037    0    0   

CMS Platinum Fund, L.P.(4)

   462,975    462,975    0    0   

SJC Capital, LLC(5)

   15,143    15,143    0    0   

Michael Castine(6)

   15,143    15,143    0    0   

Michael Downey(6)

   15,143    15,143    0    0   

James Cahill(7)

   95,343    95,343    0    0   

Daniel Gressel(6)

   15,143    15,143    0    0   

John Merchant(6)

   15,143    15,143    0    0   

Barry Schlesinger(8)

   192,959    192,959    0    0   

Freeman Lyle(9)

   705,724    62,463    643,261    1.6 %

William J. McMorrow Revocable Trust(10)

   12,760,369    1,422,826    11,337,543    27.5 %

Jerry Solomon(11)

   57,837    57,837    0    0   

Norm Creighton(12)

   230,574    230,574    0    0   

Donald J. Herrema(13)

   656,875    55,687    601,188    1.5 %

Mary Ricks(14)

   1,112,579    101,257    1,011,322    2.4 %

Kent Y. Mouton(15)

   58,542    58,542    0    0   

Cathy Hendrickson(16)

   3,094    3,094    0    0   

Robert E. Hart(17)

   146,754    146,754    0    0   

James Rosten(18)

   286,540    286,540    0    0   

Malibu Companies LLC

   975,569    975,569    0    0   
             

Total Shares Offered

      9,612,161      

 

Name of Selling Security Holder

   Number  of
Warrants
Beneficially
Owned Prior
to the Offering
   Total Number
of  Warrants
Owned Being
Registered
   Number  of
Warrants
Beneficially
Owned After
the Offering
   Percentage  of
Warrants
Beneficially
Owned After
the Offering

Flat Ridge Investments LLC(2)

   2,710,742    2,710,742    0    0

LLM Structured Equity Fund L.P.(3)

   1,416,814    1,416,814    0    0

LLM Investors L.P.(3)

   28,914    28,914    0    0

CMS Platinum Fund, L.P.(4)

   361,432    361,432    0    0

Malibu Companies LLC

   475,569    475,569    0    0
             

Total Warrants Offered

      4,993,471      

 

(1) Assumes exercise of all of the holder’s outstanding warrants. The numbers of shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants will be subject to adjustment upon a stock dividend, stock split and upon the occurrence of certain transactions. As a result, the number of shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants may be adjusted in the future.

 

79


Table of Contents
(2) David A. Minella, our director and former Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, is the Managing Member of Flat Ridge Investments LLC, and may be deemed to beneficially own the securities beneficially owned by Flat Ridge Investments LLC. Mr. Minella disclaims beneficial ownership of any securities in which he does not have a pecuniary interest.
(3) Patrick J. Landers, our former director and President, may be deemed to beneficially own the securities beneficially owned by LLM Structured Equity Fund L.P. and LLM Investors L.P. Mr. Landers owns a 50% membership interest in LLM Capital Group LLC, which owns a 75% membership interest in LLM Capital Partners LLC. LLM Capital Partners LLC is the Sole Member of LLM Advisors LLC, which is the General Partner of LLM Advisors L.P. LLM Advisors LLC makes investment decisions through an investment committee on behalf of LLM Advisors L.P., which is the General Partner of each of LLM Structured Equity Fund L.P. and LLM Investors L.P. Mr. Landers is a member of the investment committee of LLM Advisors LLC. Mr. Landers disclaims beneficial ownership of any securities in which he does not have a pecuniary interest.
(4) William Landman, our former director, is the Managing Member of CMS Platinum Fund, L.P. (formerly Capital Management Systems, Inc.) and may be deemed to beneficially own the securities beneficially owned by CMS Platinum Fund, L.P. Mr. Landman disclaims beneficial ownership of any securities in which he does not have a pecuniary interest.
(5) William Cvengros, our former director, is the Managing Member of SJC Capital LLC, and may be deemed to beneficially own the securities beneficially owned by SJC Capital LLC. Mr. Cvengros disclaims beneficial ownership of any securities in which he does not have a pecuniary interest.
(6) Former director.
(7) Former Chief Financial Officer and Secretary.
(8) Mr. Schlesinger is our Chief Administrative Officer.
(9) Mr. Lyle is our Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.
(10) Mr. McMorrow is trustee of the William J. McMorrow Revocable Trust. Mr. McMorrow is our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.
(11) Mr. Solomon is a member of our board of directors.
(12) Mr. Creighton is a member of our board of directors.
(13) Mr. Herrema is CEO of KW Capital Markets and Executive Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.
(14) Ms. Ricks is CEO of KW Commercial Investment Group and Vice Chairman of Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.
(15) Mr. Mouton is a member of our board of directors.
(16) Ms. Hendrickson is a member of our board of directors.
(17) Mr. Hart is President of KW Multi-Family Management Group.
(18) Mr. Rosten is President of Kennedy-Wilson Properties.

 

80


Table of Contents

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

The following discussion summarizes the material terms of our securities. This discussion does not purport to be complete and is qualified in its entirety by reference to our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws.

General

Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation authorizes the issuance 80,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $.0001, and 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $.0001. As of June 8, 2010, 41,284,658 shares of common stock are outstanding, held by stockholders of record and 100,000 shares of preferred stock were outstanding.

Common Stock

As of the date of this prospectus, there were 41,284,658 shares of common stock outstanding. Holders of common stock have exclusive voting rights for the election of our directors and all other matters requiring stockholder action, except with respect to amendments to our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation that alter or change the powers, preferences, rights or other terms of any outstanding preferred stock if the holders of such affected series of preferred stock are entitled to vote on such an amendment. Holders of common stock are entitled to one vote per share on matters to be voted on by stockholders and also are entitled to receive such dividends, if any, as may be declared from time to time by our board of directors in its discretion out of funds legally available therefor. The payment of dividends, if ever, on the common stock will be subject to the prior payment of dividends on any outstanding shares of preferred stock. Our common stock has no conversion, preemptive or other subscription rights and there are no sinking fund or redemption provisions applicable to the common stock.

Our board of directors is divided into three classes, each of which generally serve for a term of three years with only one class of directors being elected in each year. There is no cumulative voting with respect to the election of directors, with the result that the holders of more than 50% of the shares voted for the election of directors can elect all of the directors.

Preferred Stock

Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation, provides that shares of preferred stock may be issued from time to time in one or more series. Our board of directors is authorized to fix the voting rights, if any, the designations, powers, and preferences, the relative, participating, optional or other special rights and any qualifications, limitations and restrictions, applicable to the shares of each series of preferred stock. Our board of directors is able to, without stockholder approval, issue preferred stock with voting and other rights that could adversely affect the voting power and other rights of the holders of the common stock and could have anti-takeover effects. The ability of our board of directors to issue preferred stock without stockholder approval could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change of control or the removal of existing management by diluting the stock ownership or voting rights of a person seeking to obtain control of the Company or remove existing management.

On May 19, 2010, we designated 100,000 of our authorized shares of preferred stock as Series A Preferred Stock by filing a certificate of designation with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware. Under the certificate of designation, prior to May 19, 2015, each share of Series A Preferred Stock is convertible, at the option of the holder at any time, into approximately 81 shares of common stock, subject to adjustment under certain circumstances. On May 19, 2015, each outstanding share of Series A Preferred Stock will automatically be converted into shares of common stock at the then applicable conversion rate.

As of the date of this prospectus, there were 100,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock outstanding. Cumulative dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock accrue at an annual rate of 6% of the

 

81


Table of Contents

purchase price, subject to adjustment under certain circumstances. The dividends are payable quarterly in arrears when, as and if declared by the Board of Directors. Subject to limited exceptions, holders of the Series A Preferred Stock will have no voting or management rights. The certificate of designation contains customary anti-dilution protection. The holders of the Series A Preferred Stock are also entitled to a $1,000 liquidation preference for each share of Series A Preferred Stock held.

Warrants

Public Warrants

Each public warrant entitles the registered holder to purchase one share of our common stock at a price of $12.50 per share, subject to adjustment as discussed below, at any time before November 14, 2014.

However, the public warrants are exercisable only if a registration statement relating to the common stock issuable upon exercise of the public warrants is effective and current. The public warrants will expire on November 14, 2014 or earlier upon redemption.

At any time while the public warrants are exercisable and there is an effective registration statement covering the shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the public warrants available and current throughout the 30 day redemption period, we may call the outstanding public warrants (except as described below with respect to the sponsors warrants) for redemption:

 

   

in whole and not in part at a price of $.01 per warrant if the sale price of our common stock equals or exceeds $19.50 per share for any 20 trading days within a 30 trading day period ending on the third business day prior to the notice of redemption to warrantholders; and

 

   

upon not less than 30 days’ prior written notice of redemption to each warrantholder.

The public warrants are issued in registered form under a warrant agreement between Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, as warrant agent, and us. You should review a copy of the warrant agreement for a complete description of the terms and conditions of the public warrants.

We established these redemption criteria to provide warrantholders with a significant premium to the initial warrant exercise price as well as a sufficient degree of liquidity to cushion the market reaction, if any, to our redemption call. If the foregoing conditions are satisfied and we issue notice of redemption of the public warrants, each warrantholder shall be entitled to exercise his or her warrant prior to the scheduled redemption date. However, there can be no assurance that the price of common stock will exceed the redemption trigger price or the warrant exercise price after the redemption notice is issued.

If we call the public warrants for redemption as described above, our management will have the option to require any holder that wishes to exercise his, her or its warrant (including the sponsors warrants) to do so on a “cashless basis.” If our management takes advantage of this option, all holders of public warrants would pay the exercise price by surrendering his, her or its public warrants for that number of shares of common stock equal to the quotient obtained by dividing (x) the product of the number of shares of common stock underlying the public warrants, multiplied by the difference between the exercise price of the public warrants and the “fair market value” (defined below) by (y) the fair market value. The “fair market value” shall mean the average reported last sale price of the common stock for the ten trading days ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which the notice of redemption is sent to the holders of public warrants. If our management takes advantage of this option, the notice of redemption will contain the information necessary to calculate the number of shares of common stock to be received upon exercise of the public warrants, including the “fair market value” in such case. Requiring a cashless exercise in this manner will reduce the number of shares to be issued and thereby lessen the dilutive effect of a warrant redemption. If we call our public warrants for redemption and our management does not take advantage of this option, our sponsors and their respective transferees would still be entitled to exercise their sponsor warrants for cash or on a cashless basis using the same formula described above that other warrantholders would have been required to use had all warrantholders been required to exercise their public warrants on a cashless basis.

 

82


Table of Contents

The exercise price and number of shares of common stock issuable on exercise of the public warrants may be adjusted in certain circumstances including in the event of a stock dividend, or our recapitalization, reorganization, merger or consolidation. However, the exercise price and number of shares of common stock issuable on exercise of the public warrants will not be adjusted for issuances of common stock at a price below the warrant exercise price except in certain circumstances.

The public warrants may be exercised upon surrender of the warrant certificate on or prior to the expiration date at the offices of the warrant agent, with the exercise form on the reverse side of the warrant certificate completed and executed as indicated, accompanied by full payment of the exercise price, by certified check payable to us, for the number of public warrants being exercised. On the exercise of any warrant, the warrant exercise price will be paid directly to us and not placed in the trust account. In no event may the public warrants be net cash settled. Warrantholders do not have the rights or privileges of holders of common stock, including voting rights, until they exercise their public warrants and receive shares of common stock. After the issuance of shares of common stock upon exercise of the public warrants, each holder will be entitled to one vote for each share held of record on all matters to be voted on by stockholders.

No public warrants will be exercisable and we will not be obligated to issue shares of common stock unless at the time a holder seeks to exercise such warrant, a prospectus relating to the common stock issuable upon exercise of the public warrants is current and the common stock has been registered or qualified or deemed to be exempt under the securities laws of the state of residence of the holder of the public warrants. Under the terms of the warrant agreement we have agreed to use our best efforts to meet these conditions and to maintain a current prospectus relating to the common stock issuable upon exercise of the public warrants until the expiration of the public warrants. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to do so and, if we do not maintain a current prospectus relating to these shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the public warrants, holders will be unable to exercise their public warrants and we will not be required to settle any such warrant exercise. If the prospectus relating to these shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of the public warrants is not current or if the common stock is not qualified or exempt from qualification in the jurisdictions in which the holders of the public warrants reside, the public warrants may have no value, the market for the public warrants may be limited and the public warrants may expire worthless.

No fractional shares will be issued upon exercise of the public warrants. If a holder exercises public warrants and would be entitled to receive a fractional interest of a share, we will round up the number of shares of common stock to be issued to the warrantholder to the nearest whole number of shares.

Sponsors Warrants

The sponsors warrants are identical to the public warrants, except that the sponsors warrants:

 

   

are non-redeemable so long as they are held by any of the sponsors or their permitted transferees; and

 

   

may be exercised for cash or on a cashless basis as described below.

Although the shares of common stock issuable pursuant to the sponsors warrants will not be issued pursuant to a registration statement so long as they are held by the sponsors and their permitted transferees, the warrant agreement provides that the sponsors warrants may not be exercised unless we have an effective registration statement relating to the common stock issuable upon exercise of the sponsors warrants and a related current prospectus is available.

 

83


Table of Contents

If holders of the sponsors warrants elect to exercise them on a cashless basis, they would pay the exercise price by surrendering his, her or its sponsor warrants for that number of shares of common stock equal to the quotient obtained by dividing (x) the product of the number of shares of common stock underlying the sponsor warrants, multiplied by the difference between the exercise price of the sponsor warrants and the “fair market value” (defined below) by (y) the fair market value. The “fair market value” shall mean the average reported last sale price of the common stock for the ten trading days ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which the notice of redemption is sent to the holders of sponsor warrants. The reason that we agreed that these sponsor warrants will be exercisable on a cashless basis so long as they are held by the sponsors and their affiliates and permitted transferees is because it is not known at this time whether they will be affiliated with us following a business combination. If they remain affiliated with us, their ability to sell securities in the open market will be significantly limited.

The sponsors or their permitted transferees are entitled to registration rights with respect to the sponsors warrants under an agreement signed with us.

Transfer Agent, Warrant Agent and Registrar

The transfer agent for our securities and the warrant agent for our warrants is Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, 17 Battery Place, New York, New York 10004; telephone (212) 509-4000.

Certain Anti-Takeover Provisions of Delaware Law and our Second Amended and Restated

Certificate of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws

Staggered board of directors

Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides for our board of directors to be classified into three classes of directors of approximately equal size. As a result, in most circumstances, a person can gain control of our board only by successfully engaging in a proxy contest at two or more annual meetings.

Special meeting of stockholders

Our amended and restated bylaws provide that special meetings of our stockholders may be called only by a majority vote of our board of directors, by our chief executive officer or our chairman.

Advance notice requirements for stockholder proposals and director nominations

Our amended and restated bylaws provide that stockholders seeking to bring business before our annual meeting of stockholders, or to nominate candidates for election as directors at our annual meeting of stockholders, must provide timely notice of their intent in writing. To be timely, a stockholder’s notice must be delivered to or mailed and received at our principal executive offices not later than the 90th day and not earlier than the 120th day, prior to the meeting. For any annual meeting of stockholders for which less than 90 days notice or public disclosure of the date of the annual meeting is given or made to stockholders, a stockholder’s notice shall be timely if delivered to or mailed and received at our principal executive offices no later than the close of business on the 10 th day following the day on which such notice of the date of the annual meeting was mailed or such public disclosure was made, whichever first occurs. Our amended and restated bylaws also specify certain requirements as to the form and content of a stockholders meeting. These provisions may preclude our stockholders from bringing matters before our annual meeting of stockholders or from making nominations for directors at our annual meeting of stockholders.

Authorized but unissued shares

Our authorized but unissued shares of common stock and preferred stock are available for future issuances without stockholder approval and could be utilized for a variety of corporate purposes, including future offerings to raise additional capital, acquisitions and employee benefit plans. The existence of

 

84


Table of Contents

authorized but unissued and unreserved common stock and preferred stock could render more difficult or discourage an attempt to obtain control of us by means of a proxy contest, tender offer, merger or otherwise.

Limitation on Liability and Indemnification of Directors and Officers

Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that our directors and officers will be indemnified by us to the fullest extent authorized by Delaware law as it now exists or may in the future be amended. In addition, our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that our directors will not be personally liable for monetary damages to us for breaches of their fiduciary duty as directors, except for liability (i) for any breach of the director’s duty of loyalty to the Company or its stockholders, (ii) for acts or omissions not in good faith or which involve intentional misconduct or a knowing violation of law, (iii) under Section 174 of the DGCL, or (iv) for any transaction from which the director derived an improper personal benefit.

Our amended and restated bylaws permit us to secure insurance on behalf of any officer, director or employee for any liability arising out of his or her actions, regardless of whether Delaware law would permit indemnification.

These provisions may discourage stockholders from bringing a lawsuit against our directors for breach of their fiduciary duty. These provisions also may have the effect of reducing the likelihood of derivative litigation against directors and officers, even though such an action, if successful, might otherwise benefit us and our stockholders. Furthermore, a stockholder’s investment may be adversely affected to the extent we pay the costs of settlement and damage awards against directors and officers pursuant to these indemnification provisions. We believe that these provisions, the insurance and the indemnity agreements are necessary to attract and retain talented and experienced directors and officers.

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, may be permitted to our directors, officers and controlling persons pursuant to the foregoing provisions, or otherwise, we have been advised that in the opinion of the SEC such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is, therefore, unenforceable.

Registration rights

The holders of the founders’ common stock, as well as the holders of the sponsors’ warrants (and underlying securities) have been granted registration rights, pursuant to which the holders of the majority of these securities are entitled to make up to three demands that we register such securities. The holders of the majority of the founders’ common stock can elect to exercise these registration rights at any time generally commencing nine months after the consummation of our merger with Kennedy-Wilson. Inc. The holders of a majority of the sponsors’ warrants (or underlying securities) can elect to exercise these registration rights at any time. In addition, the holders have certain “piggy-back” registration rights with respect to registration statements filed subsequent to consummation of our merger with Kennedy-Wilson. Inc. We will bear the expenses incurred in connection with the filing of any such registration statement.

In addition, we are required to use its best efforts to have a registration statement in effect covering the shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of our outstanding warrants and to maintain a current prospectus relating to such shares until our warrants expire or are redeemed.

The holders of the Series A Preferred Stock have been granted registration rights, pursuant to which the holders of the majority of these securities are entitled to make up to three demands that we register such securities. The holders of the majority of the Series A Preferred Stock can elect to exercise these registration rights at any time generally on or following November 13, 2010. In addition, the holders have certain “piggy-back” registration rights with respect to registration statements filed by us. We will bear the expenses incurred in connection with the filing of any such registration statement.

Listing

Our common stock is traded on the NYSE under the symbol “KW”.

 

85


Table of Contents

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

We are registering an aggregate of 4,993,471 warrants. We are also registering 20,278,690 shares of common stock consisting of:

 

   

4,993,471 shares of common stock underlying warrants purchased by our founding stockholders in a private placement;

 

   

10,666,529 shares of common stock underlying warrants issued in our initial public offering pursuant to a prospectus dated November 14, 2007; and

 

   

4,618,690 shares of common stock purchased by our founding stockholders in a private placement and issued to certain of our officers and directors in connection with our merger with Kennedy-Wilson, Inc.

A “Warrant Holder”, as used in this prospectus, may include persons who receive warrants or shares of common stock from a Warrant Holder after the date of this prospectus. We will bear all costs, expenses and fees in connection with the registration of the warrants and shares of common stock underlying each of the warrants offered in this prospectus. The Selling Security Holders will bear any brokerage commissions and similar selling expenses that may result from their resale of the shares of common stock offered in this prospectus.

The shares of common stock underlying the warrants offered by us through this prospectus will be issued upon surrender of the associated warrant certificate, completion of documentation to evidence the exercise of the warrant and payment of the exercise price of $12.50 per share in cash, good certified check or good bank draft, to our warrant agent, Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company. Upon proper exercise of a warrant, our warrant agent will issue the shares of common stock underlying the exercised warrant in the name of the person as directed by the Warrant Holder. The Warrant Holder may exercise all or any portion of a warrant beginning after the date that the registration statement relating to this prospectus becomes effective and ending on November 14, 2014, unless earlier redeemed. Once issued to a Warrant Holder upon proper exercise of a warrant, the shares of common stock registered in this registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part will be freely tradeable in the hands of persons other than our affiliates.

Copies of this prospectus will be delivered to the record holders of our warrants promptly following the effective date of the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part. Any Warrant Holder who desires to purchase shares of common stock under this prospectus must properly exercise his or her warrants on or before November 14, 2014.

The Selling Security Holders and any of their pledgees, donees, assignees and successors-in-interest may, from time to time, sell any or all of their warrants or shares of our common stock being offered under this prospectus on any stock exchange, market or trading facility on which the warrants or shares are traded or in private transactions. These sales may be at fixed or negotiated prices. The Selling Security Holders may use any one or more of the following methods when disposing of warrants or shares:

 

   

ordinary brokerage transactions and transactions in which the broker-dealer solicits purchasers;

 

   

block trades in which the broker-dealer will attempt to sell the warrants or shares as agent but may position and resell a portion of the block as principal to facilitate the transaction;

 

   

purchases by a broker-dealer as principal and resales by the broker-dealer for its account;

 

   

an exchange distribution in accordance with the rules of the applicable exchange;

 

86


Table of Contents
   

privately negotiated transactions;

 

   

to cover short sales made after the date that the registration statement, of which this prospectus is a part, is declared effective by the SEC;

 

   

broker-dealers may agree with the Selling Security Holders to sell a specified number of such warrants or shares at a stipulated price per share;

 

   

a combination of any of these methods of sale; and

 

   

any other method permitted pursuant to applicable law.

The warrants or shares may also be sold under Rule 144 or other applicable provision under the Securities Act, if available, rather than under this prospectus. The Selling Security Holders have the sole and absolute discretion not to accept any purchase offer or make any sale of warrants or shares if they deem the purchase price to be unsatisfactory at any particular time.

The Selling Security Holders may pledge their warrants or shares to their brokers under the margin provisions of customer agreements. If a Selling Security Holder defaults on a margin loan, the broker may, from time to time, offer and sell the pledged warrants or shares.

Broker-dealers engaged by the Selling Security Holders may arrange for other broker-dealers to participate in sales. Broker-dealers may receive commissions or discounts from the Selling Security Holders (or, if any broker-dealer acts as agent for the purchaser of warrants or shares, from the purchaser) in amounts to be negotiated, which commissions as to a particular broker or dealer may be in excess of customary commissions to the extent permitted by applicable law.

The Selling Security Holders and any broker-dealers or agents that are involved in selling the warrants or shares offered under this prospectus may be deemed to be “underwriters” within the meaning of the Securities Act in connection with these sales. Commissions received by these broker-dealers or agents and any profit on the resale of the warrants or shares purchased by them may be deemed to be underwriting commissions or discounts under the Securities Act. Any broker-dealers or agents that are deemed to be underwriters may not sell warrants or shares offered under this prospectus unless and until we set forth the names of the underwriters and the material details of their underwriting arrangements in a supplement to this prospectus or, if required, in a replacement prospectus included in a post-effective amendment to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part.

The Selling Security Holders and any other persons participating in the sale or distribution of the warrants or shares offered under this prospectus will be subject to applicable provisions of the Exchange Act and the rules and regulations under that act, including Regulation M. These provisions may restrict activities of, and limit the timing of purchases and sales of any of the warrants or shares by, the Selling Security Holders or any other person. Furthermore, under Regulation M, persons engaged in a distribution of securities are prohibited from simultaneously engaging in market making and other activities with respect to those securities for a specified period of time prior to the commencement of such distributions, subject to specified exceptions or exemptions. All of these limitations may affect the marketability of the warrants or shares.

If any of the warrants or shares of common stock offered for resale pursuant to this prospectus are transferred other than pursuant to a sale under this prospectus, then subsequent holders could not use this prospectus until a post-effective amendment or prospectus supplement is filed, naming such holders. We offer no assurance as to whether any of the Selling Security Holders will sell all or any portion of the warrants or shares offered under this prospectus.

 

87


Table of Contents

LEGAL MATTERS

The validity of the securities offered in this prospectus will be passed upon for us by Loeb & Loeb LLP.

EXPERTS

The consolidated financial statements of Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, and for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2009, have been included herein in reliance upon the reports of KPMG LLP, independent registered public accounting firm, and Grant Thornton Taiyo ASG, independent registered public accounting firm, included herein, and upon the authority of said firms as experts in accounting and auditing.

The consolidated balance sheets of KW Residential LLC and subsidiaries, as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income, members’ equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2009, have been included herein in reliance upon the report of Grant Thornton Taiyo ASG, independent registered public accounting firm, whose report appears herein, and upon the authority of said firm as experts in accounting and auditing.

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

We have filed a registration statement on Form S-1 with respect to the securities offered in this prospectus with the SEC in accordance with the Securities Act and the rules and regulations enacted under its authority. This prospectus, which constitutes a part of the registration statement, does not contain all of the information included in the registration statement and its exhibits and schedules. Statements contained in this prospectus regarding the contents of any document referred to in this prospectus are not necessarily complete, and in each instance, we refer you to the full text of the document that is filed as an exhibit to the registration statement. Each statement concerning a document that is filed as an exhibit should be read along with the entire document. We also file annual, quarterly and current reports and other information with the SEC. For further information regarding us and the securities offered in this prospectus, we refer you to the registration statement and its exhibits and schedules, which may be inspected without charge at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. You may also read and copy our reports and other information filed with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room. Please call the SEC at (800) 732-0330 for further information on the Public Reference Room.

The SEC also maintains an Internet website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers, such as us, that file electronically with the SEC. The SEC’s website address is http://www.sec.gov.

Our corporate website is http://www.KennedyWilson.com. The information contained in, or that can be accessed through, our website is not part of this prospectus and should not be relied upon in determining whether to purchase our securities.

 

88


Table of Contents

Index to Financial Statements

 

     Page

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   F-2

Audited Financial Statements of Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and Subsidiaries

  

Consolidated Balance Sheets

   F-3

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss

   F-4

Consolidated Statements of Equity

   F-5

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

   F-6

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   F-8

Unaudited Financial Statements of Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and Subsidiaries

  

Consolidated Balance Sheets

   F-36

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss

   F-37

Consolidated Statements of Equity

   F-38

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

   F-39

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   F-40

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   F-45

Financial Statements of KW Residential, LLC and Subsidiaries

  

Consolidated Balance Sheets

   F-46

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income

   F-47

Consolidated Statements of Members Equity

   F-48

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

   F-49

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   F-50

 

F-1


Table of Contents

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Stockholders

Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss, equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2009. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We did not audit the financial statements of KW Residential, LLC, (a 35 percent owned investee company). The Company’s investment in KW Residential, LLC at December 31, 2009, was $91,276,000, and its equity in joint venture income of KW Residential, LLC was $5,949,000 for the year 2009. The financial statements of KW Residential, LLC were audited by other auditors whose report has been furnished to us, and our opinion, insofar as it related to the amounts included for KW Residential, LLC, is based solely on the report of the other auditors.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, based on our audits and the report of the other auditors, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2009, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

 

/s/ KPMG LLP

Los Angeles, California

March 16, 2010

 

F-2


Table of Contents

Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

     December 31,
     2009    2008

Assets

     

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 57,784,000    $ 25,831,000

Accounts receivable

     887,000      1,091,000

Accounts receivable—related parties

     4,278,000      4,659,000

Income tax receivable

     6,848,000      2,368,000

Notes receivable

     541,000      43,000

Notes receivable—related parties

     6,644,000      3,755,000

Investments in real estate, net

     40,581,000      48,727,000

Investments in real estate available for sale

     2,472,000      —  

Investments in joint ventures ($19,590,000 and $15,088,000 carried at fair value as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively)

     185,252,000      142,188,000

Other assets

     7,005,000      4,210,000

Goodwill

     23,965,000      23,965,000
             

Total assets

   $ 336,257,000    $ 256,837,000
             

Liabilities and equity

     

Liabilities

     

Accounts payable

   $ 860,000    $ 359,000

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

     8,648,000      7,008,000

Accrued salaries and benefits

     4,401,000      2,775,000

Deferred tax liability

     15,439,000      9,470,000

Notes payable

     26,133,000      21,188,000

Borrowings under line of credit

     10,000,000      13,500,000

Mortgage loans payable

     23,968,000      29,548,000

Convertible subordinated debt

     27,472,000      27,187,000

Junior subordinated debentures

     40,000,000      40,000,000
             

Total liabilities

     156,921,000      151,035,000
             

Equity

     

Preferred stock, $.0001 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, 0 shares issued at December 31, 2009 and 2008

     —        —  

Common stock, $0.0001 par value: 80,000,000 and 73,000,000 shares authorized, 41,177,658 and 26,387,199 shares issued, as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively

     4,000      3,000

Additional paid-in capital

     155,878,000      60,079,000

Retained earnings

     18,829,000      45,467,000

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     2,603,000      2,000
             

Total Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. stockholders’ equity

     177,314,000      105,551,000

Noncontrolling interests

     2,022,000      251,000
             

Total equity

     179,336,000      105,802,000
             

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 336,257,000    $ 256,837,000
             

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3


Table of Contents

Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2009     2008     2007  

Revenue

      

Management and leasing fees

   $ 9,026,000      $ 10,671,000      $ 9,836,000   

Management and leasing fees—related party

     10,138,000        8,380,000        10,306,000   

Commissions

     4,204,000        5,906,000        4,257,000   

Commissions—related party

     727,000        4,295,000        8,896,000   

Sale of real estate

     52,699,000        —          —     

Sale of real estate—related party

     6,698,000        —          —     

Rental and other income

     2,743,000        2,973,000        98,000   
                        

Total revenue

     86,235,000        32,225,000        33,393,000   
                        

Operating Expenses

      

Commission and marketing expenses

     3,411,000        2,827,000        2,097,000   

Compensation and related expenses

     24,789,000        21,292,000        34,151,000   

Merger-related compensation and related expenses

     12,468,000        —          —     

Cost of real estate sold

     36,179,000        —          —     

Cost of real estate sold—related party

     5,752,000        —          —     

General and administrative

     6,351,000        6,074,000        6,393,000   

Merger-related general and administrative

     3,652,000        —          —     

Depreciation and amortization

     1,122,000        920,000        505,000   

Rental operating expense

     1,148,000        1,458,000        34,000   
                        

Total operating expenses

     94,872,000        32,571,000        43,180,000   
                        

Equity in joint venture income

     8,019,000        10,097,000        27,433,000   
                        

Operating income

     (618,000 )     9,751,000        17,646,000   

Non-operating income (expense)

      

Interest income

     102,000        221,000        487,000   

Interest income—related party

     400,000        341,000        378,000   

Interest expense

     (13,174,000 )     (8,596,000 )     (5,090,000 )

Other than temporary impairment on available-for-sale security

     (328,000 )     (445,000 )     —     
                        

(Loss) income before benefit from (provision for) income taxes

     (13,618,000 )     1,272,000        13,421,000   

Benefit from (provision for) income taxes

     3,961,000        (605,000 )     (4,384,000 )
                        

(Loss) income from continuing operations

     (9,657,000 )     667,000        9,037,000   

Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

     —          —          2,797,000   
                        

Net (loss) income

     (9,657,000 )     667,000        11,834,000   

Net income attributable to the noncontrolling interests

     (5,679,000 )     (54,000 )     (2,441,000 )
                        

Net (loss) income attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. shareholders

     (15,336,000 )     613,000        9,393,000   

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

     2,601,000        240,000        (238,000 )
                        

Total comprehensive (loss) income

   $ (12,735,000 )   $ 853,000      $ 9,155,000   
                        

Basic (loss) income per share attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. shareholders

      

(Loss) income from continuing operations attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.

   $ (0.57 )   $ 0.03      $ 0.41   

Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes, attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.

     —          —          0.08   
                        

Net (loss) income attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.

   $ (0.57 )   $ 0.03      $ 0.49   
                        

Weighted average shares outstanding for basic (loss) income per share

     26,891,304        22,892,498        19,258,613   
                        

Diluted (loss) income per share attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. shareholders

      

(Loss) income from continuing operations attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.

   $ (0.57 )   $ 0.03      $ 0.37   

Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes, attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.

     —          —          0.07   
                        

Net (loss) income attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc.

   $ (0.57 )   $ 0.03      $ 0.44   
                        

Weighted average shares outstanding for diluted income (loss) per share

     26,891,304        24,310,299        21,380,174   
                        

Amounts attributable to Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. shareholders

      

(Loss) income from continuing operations, net of tax

   $ (15,336,000 )   $ 613,000      $ 7,915,000   

Discontinued operations, net of tax

     —          —          1,478,000   
                        

Net (loss) income

   $ (15,336,000 )   $ 613,000      $ 9,393,000   
                        

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4


Table of Contents

Kennedy-Wilson Holdings, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statement of Equity

 

     Common Stock    Additional
Paid-in Capital
    Retained
Earnings
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income
    Noncontrolling
Interests
    Total  
     Shares     Amount                               

Balance, January 1, 2007

   21,620,920      2,000    $ 11,720,000      $ 37,725,000      $ —        $ 156,000      $ 49,603,000   

Issuance of common stock—exercise of stock options

   209,170      —        236,000        —          —          —          236,000   

Repurchase of common stock

   (459,720 )   —        (2,996,000 )     —          —          —          (2,996,000 )

Amortization of equity compensation

   —        —        1,015,000        —          —          —          1,015,000   

Other comprehensive loss:

               

Foreign currency translation, net of tax of $29,000

   —        —        —          —          (44,000 )     —          (44,000 )

Unrealized loss on marketable security, net of tax of $129,000

   —        —        —          —          (194,000 )     —          (194,000 )

Net income

   —        —        —          9,393,000        —          2,441,000        11,834,000   

Contributions from noncontrolling interests

   —        —        —          —          —          1,615,000        1,615,000   

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

   —        —        —          —          —          (3,993,000 )     (3,993,000 )
                                                   

Balance, December 31, 2007

   21,370,370      2,000      9,975,000        47,118,000        (238,000 )     219,000        57,076,000   

Issuance of common stock

   5,598,982      1,000      52,353,000        —          —          —          52,354,000   

Issuance of common stock—exercise of stock options

   42,785      —        93,000        —          —          —          93,000   

Repurchase of common stock

   (624,938 )   —        (6,170,000 )     —          —          —          (6,170,000 )

Amortization of equity compensation

   —        —        1,015,000        —          —          —          1,015,000   

Discount on convertible subordinated debt

   —        —        2,813,000        —          —          —          2,813,000   

Other comprehensive loss:

               

Foreign currency translation, net of tax of $160,000

   —        —        —          —          240,000        —          240,000   

Dividends paid

   —        —        —          (2,264,000 )     —          —          (2,264,000 )

Net income

   —        —        —          613,000        —          54,000        667,000   

Contributions from noncontrolling interests

   —        —        —          —          —          482,000        482,000   

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

   —        —        —          —          —          (504,000 )     (504,000 )
                                                   

Balance, December 31, 2008

   26,387,199      3,000      60,079,000        45,467,000        2,000        251,000        105,802,000   

Proceeds from issuance of common stock in connection with the Merger

   12,820,215      1,000      89,006,000        —          —          —          89,007,000   

Issuance of common stock—exercise of stock options

   55,449      —        59,000        —          —          —          59,000   

Repurchase of common stock

   (442,648   —        (3,690,000 )     —          —          —          (3,690,000 )

Stock compensation expense

   —        —        3,857,000        —          —          —          3,857,000   

Common stock issued under 2009 Equity Participation Plan

   2,357,443      —        —          —          —          —          —     

2009 Equity Participation Plan replacement payment

   —        —        (1,500,000 )     —          —          —          (1,500,000 )

Other comprehensive loss:

               

Foreign currency translation, net of tax of $1,472,000

   —        —        —          —          2,407,000        —          2,407,000   

Unrealized loss on marketable security, net of tax of $129,000

   —        —        —          —          194,000        —          194,000   

Dividends paid

   —        —        —          (3,235,000 )     —          —          (3,235,000 )

Additional shares to pre-Merger preferred shareholders

   —        —        7,879,000        (7,879,000 )     —          —          —     

Accretion of common stock beneficial conversion

   —        —        188,000        (188,000 )     —          —          —     

Net (loss) income

   —        —        —          (15,336,000 )     —